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Title: Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues

Abstract

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding to ocular tissues has been studied by autoradiographical and biochemical approaches directly performed on sections during mouse embryonic and postnatal development. Frozen sections of embryos (9 to 18 days), newborns, and adults (1 day to 6 months) were incubated with iodinated bFGF. One specific FGF binding site (KD = 2.5 nM) is colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the basement membranes and is heparitinase sensitive. It first appears at Day 9 around the neural tube, the optic vesicles, and below the head ectoderm and by Day 14 of embryonic development is found in all basement membranes of the eye. At Day 16, very intensely labeled patches appear, corresponding to mast cells which have been characterized by metachromatic staining of their heparin-rich granulations with toluidine blue. In addition to the latter binding, we have also observed a general diffuse distribution of silver grains on all tissues and preferentially in the ecto- and neuroectodermic tissues. From Days 17-18, there is heterogeneous labeling inside the retina, localized in the pigmented epithelium and in three different layers colocalized with the inner and outer plexiform layers and with the inner segments of the photoreceptors. This binding is heparitinase resistantmore » but N-glycanase sensitive and may represent a second specific binding site corresponding to cellular FGF receptors (KD = 280 pM). Both types of binding patterns observed suggest a significant role for bFGF in eye development and physiology.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (INSERM U. 118, Paris (France))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7045542
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; (USA); Journal Volume: 188:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; EYES; ONTOGENESIS; GROWTH FACTORS; RECEPTORS; BIOLOGICAL LOCALIZATION; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; EPITHELIUM; FIBROBLASTS; HISTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES; HYDROLASES; IODINE ISOTOPES; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; MICE; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BODY; BODY AREAS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; ENZYMES; FACE; HEAD; ISOTOPES; KINETICS; MAMMALS; MITOGENS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; PROTEINS; REACTION KINETICS; RODENTS; SENSE ORGANS; SOMATIC CELLS; TISSUES; VERTEBRATES; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Fayein, N.A., Courtois, Y., and Jeanny, J.C.. Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1016/0014-4827(90)90280-N.
Fayein, N.A., Courtois, Y., & Jeanny, J.C.. Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues. United States. doi:10.1016/0014-4827(90)90280-N.
Fayein, N.A., Courtois, Y., and Jeanny, J.C.. 1990. "Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues". United States. doi:10.1016/0014-4827(90)90280-N.
@article{osti_7045542,
title = {Ontogeny of basic fibroblast growth factor binding sites in mouse ocular tissues},
author = {Fayein, N.A. and Courtois, Y. and Jeanny, J.C.},
abstractNote = {Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) binding to ocular tissues has been studied by autoradiographical and biochemical approaches directly performed on sections during mouse embryonic and postnatal development. Frozen sections of embryos (9 to 18 days), newborns, and adults (1 day to 6 months) were incubated with iodinated bFGF. One specific FGF binding site (KD = 2.5 nM) is colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the basement membranes and is heparitinase sensitive. It first appears at Day 9 around the neural tube, the optic vesicles, and below the head ectoderm and by Day 14 of embryonic development is found in all basement membranes of the eye. At Day 16, very intensely labeled patches appear, corresponding to mast cells which have been characterized by metachromatic staining of their heparin-rich granulations with toluidine blue. In addition to the latter binding, we have also observed a general diffuse distribution of silver grains on all tissues and preferentially in the ecto- and neuroectodermic tissues. From Days 17-18, there is heterogeneous labeling inside the retina, localized in the pigmented epithelium and in three different layers colocalized with the inner and outer plexiform layers and with the inner segments of the photoreceptors. This binding is heparitinase resistant but N-glycanase sensitive and may represent a second specific binding site corresponding to cellular FGF receptors (KD = 280 pM). Both types of binding patterns observed suggest a significant role for bFGF in eye development and physiology.},
doi = {10.1016/0014-4827(90)90280-N},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 188:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 5
}
  • In order to localize a rich source of basic FGF receptor, we examined the distribution of basic FGF binding sites in brain, stomach, lung, spleen, kidney, liver and intestine membrane preparations from adult guinea pig. Comparative binding studies using iodinated basic FGF showed that a specific binding was detected in all the membrane preparations tested. Scatchard plots from iodinated basic FGF competition experiment with native basic FGF in various membrane preparations, suggested the presence of one class of binding sites in some tissues such as liver, kidney, spleen, lung, stomach, and intestine with an apparent dissociation constant (appKD) value rangingmore » from 4 to 7.5 nM and the existence of a second class of higher affinity sites in brain membranes with appKD value of 15 pM. Characterization of these basic FGF high affinity interaction sites was performed using a cross-linking reagent. These results show for the first time that specific interaction sites for basic FGF are widely distributed, suggesting that this growth factor might play a role in the physiological functions of a number of adult organs.« less
  • The growth autonomy of human tumor cells is considered due to the endogenous production of growth factors. Transcriptional expression of candidates for autocrine stimulatory factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), acidic FGF, and transforming growth factor type {beta} were determined in human brain tumors. Basic FGF was expressed abundantly in 17 of 18 gliomas, 20 of 22 meningiomas, and 0 of 5 metastatic brain tumors. The level of mRNA expression of acidic FGF in gliomas was significant. In contrast, transforming growth factor type {beta}1 was expressed in all the samples investigated. The mRNA for basic FGF and itsmore » peptide were localized in tumor cells in vivo by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, showing that basic FGF is actually produced in tumor cells. The results suggest that tumor-derived basic FGF is involved in the progression of gliomas and meningiomas in vivo, whereas acidic FGF is expressed in a tumor origin-specific manner, suggesting that acidic FGF works in tandem with basic FGF in glioma tumorigenesis.« less
  • A M/sub r/ 25,000 form of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been isolated from guinea pig grain along with the typical M/sub r/ 18,000 form. Both forms were purified to homogeneity by a combination of heparin-affinity chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography on an FPLC Mono S column. The M/sub r/ 25,000 form, like the M/sub r/ 18,000 form was not eluted from the heparin-affinity column with 0.95 M NaCl, but was eluted with 2 M NaCl. The M/sub r/ 25,000 guinea pig protein stimulated plasminogen activator production by cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentration ofmore » 0.1-10 ngml, the same range that was effective for guinea pig and human M/sub r/ 18,000 bFGFs. The binding of human /sup 125/I-labeled bFGF to baby hamster kidney cells is inhibited equally by the M/sub r/ 25,000 guinea pig protein and the M/sub r/ 18,000 guinea pig and human bFGFs. Polyclonal antibodies raised against human bFGF recognize both the M/sub r/ 25,000 and 18,000 guinea pig proteins in an immunoblot analysis. In a radioimmunoassay, both the M/sub r/ 25,000 and M/sub r/ 18,000 guinea pig proteins compete equally well with iodinated human bFGF for binding to the anti-human bFGF antibodies. When treated with low concentrations of trypsin, the M/sub r/ 25,000 guinea pig bFGF was converted to a M/sub r/ 18,000 protein. These results show that the two molecules are closely related and suggest that the M/sub r/ 25,000 protein shares substantial homology with the M/sub r/ 18,000 bFGF« less
  • The binding, internalization, and degradation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in human omental microvascular endothelial cells (HOME cells) were investigated. Binding studies of bFGF in human endothelial cells have not yet been reported. Basic FGF bound to HOME cells. The number of low-affinity binding sites was found to be variable. Washing the cells with 2 M phosphate-buffered saline removed completely {sup 125}I-bFGF bound to low-affinity binding sites but decreased also the high-affinity binding. The majority of the surface-bound {sup 125}I-bFGF was removed by washing the cells with acetic acid buffer at pH 3. At this temperature, degradation of themore » internalized ligand was followed after 1 hour by the appearance of three major bands of 15,000 10,000, and 8,000 Da and was inhibited by chloroquine. These results demonstrated two classes of binding sites for bFGF in HOME cells; the number of high-affinity binding sites being larger than the number reported for bovine capillary endothelial cells. The intracellular processing of bFGF in HOME cells seems to be different from that of heparin binding growth factor-1 in murine lung capillary endothelial cells and of eye-derived growth factor-1 in Chinese hamster fibroblasts.« less
  • Two functional domains in the primary structure of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) have been identified on the basis of their ability to interact with the FGF receptor, bind radiolabeled heparin, and modulate the cellular response to FGF. Peptides derived from these two functional domains can act as partial agonists and antagonists in biological assays of FGF activity. Peptides related to the sequences of FGF-(24-68)-NH{sub 2} and FGF-(106-115)-NH{sub 2} inhibit thymidine incorporation into 3T3 fibroblasts when they are stimulated by FGF but have no effect when the cells are treated with either platelet-derived growth factor or epidermal growth factor. Theymore » also possess partial agonist activity and can stimulate DNA synthesis when tested in the absence of exogenous FGF. The active peptides have no effect on the binding of epidermal growth factor to its receptor on A431 cells and they can modulate the effects of FGF, but not fibronectin, on endothelial cell adhesion. The results suggest the possibility of designing specific analogs of FGF that are capable of inhibiting the biological effects of FGF.« less