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Title: Radon: A health problem

Abstract

Nurses can and should function as effective teachers about the potential hazards to health of radon contamination in the home as well as become activists in the development of health care policy on radon.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7043077
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Home Healthcare Nurse; (USA); Journal Volume: 8:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; HOUSES; CONTAMINATION; RADON; RADIATION HAZARDS; EDUCATION; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; RADIATION MONITORING; RISK ASSESSMENT; BUILDINGS; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; HAZARDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; MONITORING; NONMETALS; PERSONNEL; RARE GASES; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; 560161* - Radionuclide Effects, Kinetics, & Toxicology- Man

Citation Formats

Pucci, J., and Gaston, S. Radon: A health problem. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1097/00004045-199001000-00008.
Pucci, J., & Gaston, S. Radon: A health problem. United States. doi:10.1097/00004045-199001000-00008.
Pucci, J., and Gaston, S. 1990. "Radon: A health problem". United States. doi:10.1097/00004045-199001000-00008.
@article{osti_7043077,
title = {Radon: A health problem},
author = {Pucci, J. and Gaston, S.},
abstractNote = {Nurses can and should function as effective teachers about the potential hazards to health of radon contamination in the home as well as become activists in the development of health care policy on radon.},
doi = {10.1097/00004045-199001000-00008},
journal = {Home Healthcare Nurse; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 8:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}
  • Understanding similarities between health-related and radon-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors may suggest application of effective strategies of radon-related education in targeted populations. A mail survey was returned by 300 randomly selected homeowners in a community at risk for high home radon concentrations (50% response). While 64% were concerned, only 7% tested their homes. The expected association between radon knowledge, radon concern, and information-seeking was identified. In addition, those who tested their homes had greater knowledge and did more information seeking. Health values and radon concern were only weakly related. Environmental concern explained the greatest variance in radon concern (10%). Internalmore » health locus of controls were more likely to have high radon concern. Of the preventive health behaviors, not smoking and seat belt use were the best predictors of variance in radon concern (5%). Segmenting the population is suggested for best educational outcome. Relating information to environmental issues may be helpful. Health-conscious people may need awareness of risks. Issues of self-control and radon testing and reduction may be helpful for some. Synergy between smoke and radon, compounded by smokers lack of concern suggests targeting smokers for education efforts.« less
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