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Title: Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

Abstract

Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Univ., Lowell, MA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7042662
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph.D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALBUMINS; IRRADIATION; COBALT 60; RADIATION DOSES; PHENYLALANINE; SHRIMP; TYROSINE; LIQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; FOOD PROCESSING; GAMMA RADIATION; AMINO ACIDS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; ARTHROPODS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; COBALT ISOTOPES; CRUSTACEANS; DECAPODS; DOSES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; HYDROXY ACIDS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; INVERTEBRATES; IONIZING RADIATIONS; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; PROTEINS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOT 560120* -- Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture; 553004 -- Agriculture & Food Technology-- Food Protection & Preservation-- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Sullivan, N.L.B. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Sullivan, N.L.B. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp. United States.
Sullivan, N.L.B. 1993. "Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7042662,
title = {Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp},
author = {Sullivan, N.L.B.},
abstractNote = {Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

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