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Title: Diverse flow patterns in the aquifers of the Amargosa Desert and vicinity, southern Nevada and California

Abstract

Diverse flow patterns in aquifer systems located in geologically and topographically complex terrains, including locating and qualitatively characterizing vertical and lateral flow paths, areas of large vertical and lateral transmissivity, regional recharge and discharge zones, and areas of ground-water mixing, may be predicted and conceptualized from a specified procedure involving geomorphic, geologic, and hydrologic analyses. The general method for evaluating the interrelations between regional structural discontinuities and ground-water flow system response includes the integration of lineament and anomalous drainage patterns and segments, hydrogeologic units and geologic structure (including stress-strain relations), topography, geobotany, hydrochemistry, and hydrology (including modeling) analyses. This method, applied to the Amargosa Desert and vicinity in southern Nevada and adjacent Death Valley, California, showed that there are four major structural zones that may control regional, confined and intermontane, unconfined ground-water flow. The four structural zones identified and characterized for ground-water hydrology are: (a) Pahrump fault zone; (b) Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone; (c) Kawich-Greenwater rift zone; and (d) Spotted Range-Mine Mountain fault zone.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7042438
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31:1; Journal ID: ISSN 0004-5691
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUIFERS; FLUID FLOW; GEOLOGY; CALIFORNIA; NEVADA; ARID LANDS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; NORTH AMERICA; USA; 580000* - Geosciences; 540250 - Environment, Terrestrial- Site Resource & Use Studies- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Kolm, K.E., and Downey, J.S. Diverse flow patterns in the aquifers of the Amargosa Desert and vicinity, southern Nevada and California. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2113/gseegeosci.xxxi.1.33.
Kolm, K.E., & Downey, J.S. Diverse flow patterns in the aquifers of the Amargosa Desert and vicinity, southern Nevada and California. United States. doi:10.2113/gseegeosci.xxxi.1.33.
Kolm, K.E., and Downey, J.S. Tue . "Diverse flow patterns in the aquifers of the Amargosa Desert and vicinity, southern Nevada and California". United States. doi:10.2113/gseegeosci.xxxi.1.33.
@article{osti_7042438,
title = {Diverse flow patterns in the aquifers of the Amargosa Desert and vicinity, southern Nevada and California},
author = {Kolm, K.E. and Downey, J.S.},
abstractNote = {Diverse flow patterns in aquifer systems located in geologically and topographically complex terrains, including locating and qualitatively characterizing vertical and lateral flow paths, areas of large vertical and lateral transmissivity, regional recharge and discharge zones, and areas of ground-water mixing, may be predicted and conceptualized from a specified procedure involving geomorphic, geologic, and hydrologic analyses. The general method for evaluating the interrelations between regional structural discontinuities and ground-water flow system response includes the integration of lineament and anomalous drainage patterns and segments, hydrogeologic units and geologic structure (including stress-strain relations), topography, geobotany, hydrochemistry, and hydrology (including modeling) analyses. This method, applied to the Amargosa Desert and vicinity in southern Nevada and adjacent Death Valley, California, showed that there are four major structural zones that may control regional, confined and intermontane, unconfined ground-water flow. The four structural zones identified and characterized for ground-water hydrology are: (a) Pahrump fault zone; (b) Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone; (c) Kawich-Greenwater rift zone; and (d) Spotted Range-Mine Mountain fault zone.},
doi = {10.2113/gseegeosci.xxxi.1.33},
journal = {Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists; (United States)},
issn = {0004-5691},
number = ,
volume = 31:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {3}
}