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Title: Political economy of oil

Abstract

A nontechnical discussion of the political economy of the world oil market is intended to inform the beginning student as well as serve as a reference book. Beginning with definitions and an explanation of units, the text covers the world economy, oil supply, oil prices, oil consumption and non-oil energy materials supplies, oil companies, macroeconomics, and the market in an effort to relate both macro- and microeconomic phenomena. Professor Banks feels that population is the most crucial factor in economics today, followed by nonfuel minerals and energy; the technical problems pertaining to energy, however, can be managed if the first two are faced and dealt with. He thinks the outlook is good for replacing oil with other energy sources. 143 references, 23 figures, 26 tables. (DKC)

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7041137
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM; POLITICAL ASPECTS; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; MARKET; MINERALS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; PRICES; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS 294002* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Petroleum; 020700 -- Petroleum-- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Banks, F.E. Political economy of oil. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Banks, F.E. Political economy of oil. United States.
Banks, F.E. 1980. "Political economy of oil". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7041137,
title = {Political economy of oil},
author = {Banks, F.E.},
abstractNote = {A nontechnical discussion of the political economy of the world oil market is intended to inform the beginning student as well as serve as a reference book. Beginning with definitions and an explanation of units, the text covers the world economy, oil supply, oil prices, oil consumption and non-oil energy materials supplies, oil companies, macroeconomics, and the market in an effort to relate both macro- and microeconomic phenomena. Professor Banks feels that population is the most crucial factor in economics today, followed by nonfuel minerals and energy; the technical problems pertaining to energy, however, can be managed if the first two are faced and dealt with. He thinks the outlook is good for replacing oil with other energy sources. 143 references, 23 figures, 26 tables. (DKC)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 1
}

Book:
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