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Title: Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites

Abstract

The conditions attendant on the deep land burial of nuclear waste products raise a number of possible scenarios to cover the necessary 10,000 years of burial. However, no matter what kind of futuristic scenario obtains, it is desirable to develop an information system indicating the locale and nature of the deposit site and the types of materials stored, along with forewarnings not to interefere with the sites. A variety of such informational sites are suggested. Attention then turns to the recipients of such messages, recognizing from the outset that the psychological/perceptual makeup of individuals across the next 300 or so generations is virtually impossible to predict, particularly since new technologies may well alter that makeup in the furture. Nevertheless, current evidence suggests that certain human characteristics may be considered universal, and that these suggest the incorporation of selected sign signification into the message system. There are other such characteristics that, while probably not intrinsic, can probably be acquired with a minimum of formal training. That still leaves much of the message content to be deliberately created and, hence, learned. The common trefoil or other developed biohazardous signs emerge as the best candidates for a generic base symbol for the buriedmore » material.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Survey Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
7036103
Report Number(s):
BMI/ONWI-535
ON: DE84014457
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-83CH10140
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS; INTRUSION; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; 054000* - Nuclear Fuels- Health & Safety; 052002 - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage

Citation Formats

Tannenbaum, P H. Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2172/7036103.
Tannenbaum, P H. Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites. United States. doi:10.2172/7036103.
Tannenbaum, P H. Sun . "Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites". United States. doi:10.2172/7036103. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7036103.
@article{osti_7036103,
title = {Communication across 300 generations: deterring human interference with waste deposit sites},
author = {Tannenbaum, P H},
abstractNote = {The conditions attendant on the deep land burial of nuclear waste products raise a number of possible scenarios to cover the necessary 10,000 years of burial. However, no matter what kind of futuristic scenario obtains, it is desirable to develop an information system indicating the locale and nature of the deposit site and the types of materials stored, along with forewarnings not to interefere with the sites. A variety of such informational sites are suggested. Attention then turns to the recipients of such messages, recognizing from the outset that the psychological/perceptual makeup of individuals across the next 300 or so generations is virtually impossible to predict, particularly since new technologies may well alter that makeup in the furture. Nevertheless, current evidence suggests that certain human characteristics may be considered universal, and that these suggest the incorporation of selected sign signification into the message system. There are other such characteristics that, while probably not intrinsic, can probably be acquired with a minimum of formal training. That still leaves much of the message content to be deliberately created and, hence, learned. The common trefoil or other developed biohazardous signs emerge as the best candidates for a generic base symbol for the buried material.},
doi = {10.2172/7036103},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1984},
month = {4}
}