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Title: Axial resolution and the value of interpolating scan in multislice positron computed tomography

Abstract

The authors have calculated the aperture function of a positron computed tomograph (PCT) with computer simulation and evaluated both theoretically and experimentally the axial resolution of a multislice PCT, Positologica III, which has 7 slices at the interval of 16mm. The axial point spread function (PSF) was approximately a triangle at or near the center of the field and the sensitivity for the slice decreased significantly as the source moved away off the image plane. Accordingly there are low sensitivity areas between an in-plane and the adjacent cross-plane. In experiments using a myocardial phantom, a small myocardial defect of 1cm diameter could not be detected when dropped into the gap between slices, although the machine had sufficiently high resolution to deliniate it if it was on the image plane. When long-axis images of the ''myocardium'' were reconstructed three-dimensionally from the images obtained in single object position, the ''inferior wall'' dropped into the gap and disappeared. In clinical myocardial scan with N-13 labeled ammonia in a normal volunteer, a false positive defect appeared in the inferior wall. However, when the object is slided half the slice interval to perform the ''interpolating'' scan and the two sets of images were interlaced withmore » each other, no artifacts appeared. These results have suggested that the invisible regions between slices may be clinically significant if the object is thin enough in z-axis. In order to fill up the gaps between slices, it is valuable to perform the interpolating scan.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Kyoto Univ., Kyoto
OSTI Identifier:
7031531
Report Number(s):
CONF-850611-
Journal ID: CODEN: JNMEA; TRN: 87-010705
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
J. Nucl. Med.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26:5; Conference: 32. annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX, USA, 2 Jun 1985
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; RESOLUTION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EVALUATION; FUNCTIONS; IMAGES; SENSITIVITY; SEQUENTIAL SCANNING; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; COUNTING TECHNIQUES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROCESSING; SIMULATION; TOMOGRAPHY; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Senda, M, Yonekura, Y, Tamaki, N, Tanaka, Y, Komori, M, Minato, K, and Torizuka, K. Axial resolution and the value of interpolating scan in multislice positron computed tomography. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Senda, M, Yonekura, Y, Tamaki, N, Tanaka, Y, Komori, M, Minato, K, & Torizuka, K. Axial resolution and the value of interpolating scan in multislice positron computed tomography. United States.
Senda, M, Yonekura, Y, Tamaki, N, Tanaka, Y, Komori, M, Minato, K, and Torizuka, K. Wed . "Axial resolution and the value of interpolating scan in multislice positron computed tomography". United States.
@article{osti_7031531,
title = {Axial resolution and the value of interpolating scan in multislice positron computed tomography},
author = {Senda, M and Yonekura, Y and Tamaki, N and Tanaka, Y and Komori, M and Minato, K and Torizuka, K},
abstractNote = {The authors have calculated the aperture function of a positron computed tomograph (PCT) with computer simulation and evaluated both theoretically and experimentally the axial resolution of a multislice PCT, Positologica III, which has 7 slices at the interval of 16mm. The axial point spread function (PSF) was approximately a triangle at or near the center of the field and the sensitivity for the slice decreased significantly as the source moved away off the image plane. Accordingly there are low sensitivity areas between an in-plane and the adjacent cross-plane. In experiments using a myocardial phantom, a small myocardial defect of 1cm diameter could not be detected when dropped into the gap between slices, although the machine had sufficiently high resolution to deliniate it if it was on the image plane. When long-axis images of the ''myocardium'' were reconstructed three-dimensionally from the images obtained in single object position, the ''inferior wall'' dropped into the gap and disappeared. In clinical myocardial scan with N-13 labeled ammonia in a normal volunteer, a false positive defect appeared in the inferior wall. However, when the object is slided half the slice interval to perform the ''interpolating'' scan and the two sets of images were interlaced with each other, no artifacts appeared. These results have suggested that the invisible regions between slices may be clinically significant if the object is thin enough in z-axis. In order to fill up the gaps between slices, it is valuable to perform the interpolating scan.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Nucl. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 26:5,
place = {United States},
year = {1985},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
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