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Title: Maintaining plant safety margins

Abstract

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating marginmore » for the plants that it supports.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7028241
Report Number(s):
CONF-890604-
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSA; TRN: 90-023390
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA); Journal Volume: 59; Conference: Annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society, Atlanta, GA (USA), 4-8 Jun 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; MAINE YANKEE REACTOR; REACTOR SAFETY; REACTOR OPERATION; SPECIFICATIONS; VERMONT YANKEE REACTOR; BWR TYPE REACTORS; DESIGN; ENGINEERED SAFETY SYSTEMS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR CORES; REACTOR KINETICS; STEAM SYSTEMS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; ENRICHED URANIUM REACTORS; KINETICS; OPERATION; POWER REACTORS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; SAFETY; THERMAL REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 210100 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Boiling Water Cooled; 210200 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Nonboiling Water Cooled

Citation Formats

Bergeron, P.A. Maintaining plant safety margins. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Bergeron, P.A. Maintaining plant safety margins. United States.
Bergeron, P.A. 1989. "Maintaining plant safety margins". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7028241,
title = {Maintaining plant safety margins},
author = {Bergeron, P.A.},
abstractNote = {The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 59,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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