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Title: Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

Abstract

Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/NE
OSTI Identifier:
7028226
Report Number(s):
CONF-900828-4
ON: DE90014215; TRN: 90-028836
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Summer national meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, San Diego, CA (USA), 19-22 Aug 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; BWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR SAFETY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ENGINEERED SAFETY SYSTEMS; PUBLIC OPINION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTOR COOLING SYSTEMS; ACCIDENTS; COOLING SYSTEMS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; REACTORS; SAFETY; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 210100 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Boiling Water Cooled; 210200 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Nonboiling Water Cooled

Citation Formats

Forsberg, C.W. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Forsberg, C.W. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors. United States.
Forsberg, C.W. Sun . "Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7028226.
@article{osti_7028226,
title = {Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors},
author = {Forsberg, C.W.},
abstractNote = {Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990},
month = {Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1990}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs inmore » the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.« less
  • This report presents the results of several studies conducted in the inherent safety of light-water reactors that have been conducted at ORNL. In principle, the technologies currently exist to meet all safety requirements for LWRs with passive and inherent safety systems. Some of these technologies are currently being applied, while others could implemented in the near future. In several cases, technologies to meet safety requirements exist on paper, but questions have been raised regarding the practically of their applications. Passive and inherent safety is a relatively new field with a doubling time of less than 5 years for new concepts.
  • A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technicalmore » literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.« less
  • This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 3, presents papers on: Structural engineering; Advanced reactor research; Advancedmore » passive reactors; Human factors research; Human factors issues related to advanced passive light water researchers; Thermal Hydraulics; and Earth sciences. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.« less
  • Following the unexpected, but safely terminated, power and flow oscillations in the LaSalle-2 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) on March 9, 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) requested that the Office of Nuclear Regulation Research (RES) carry out BWR stability analyses, centered around fourteen specific questions. The questions are motivated by the demand to meet the General Design Criterion 12 in Appendix A of the Code of Federal Regulation 10CFR50, which requires that reactor power oscillations violating Technical Specifications be either impossible by design, or detectedmore » and suppressed. Ten of the fourteen questions address BWR stability issues in general and are dealt with in this paper. The other four questions address local, out-of-phase oscillations and matters of instrumentation; they fall outside the scope of the work reported here.« less