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Title: In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein

Abstract

The 32kDa thylakoid membrane protein is an integral component of the PS II reaction centre. The protein, although stable in the dark, undergoes light dependent turnover. Light from the UV, visible and far-red spectral regions induce 32kDa protein degradation. To better understand 32kDa protein metabolism, an in vitro degradation system is being developed. It consists of isolated thylakoid membranes than contain radiolabelled protein. The 32kDa protein is actively and specifically degraded when the thylakoid preparation is exposed to UV or visible radiation. The protein is stable in the dark. The herbicides (atrazine and DCMU) inhibit degradation in the in vitro system as they do in vivo. Additionally, several methods of isolating thylakoids are being compared to optimize the 32kDa protein degradation reaction. The preparations will be evaluated based on their ability to permit light dependent degradation of the 32kDa protein without affecting the other membrane components.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7026989
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Plant Physiology, Supplement; (USA); Journal Volume: 89:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; PROTEINS; PHOTOLYSIS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; METABOLISM; PHOTOSYNTHETIC REACTION CENTERS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; RADIATIONS; 550201* - Biochemistry- Tracer Techniques; 560120 - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture

Citation Formats

Eckenswiller, L.C., and Greenberg, B.M. In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Eckenswiller, L.C., & Greenberg, B.M. In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein. United States.
Eckenswiller, L.C., and Greenberg, B.M. Sat . "In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7026989,
title = {In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein},
author = {Eckenswiller, L.C. and Greenberg, B.M.},
abstractNote = {The 32kDa thylakoid membrane protein is an integral component of the PS II reaction centre. The protein, although stable in the dark, undergoes light dependent turnover. Light from the UV, visible and far-red spectral regions induce 32kDa protein degradation. To better understand 32kDa protein metabolism, an in vitro degradation system is being developed. It consists of isolated thylakoid membranes than contain radiolabelled protein. The 32kDa protein is actively and specifically degraded when the thylakoid preparation is exposed to UV or visible radiation. The protein is stable in the dark. The herbicides (atrazine and DCMU) inhibit degradation in the in vitro system as they do in vivo. Additionally, several methods of isolating thylakoids are being compared to optimize the 32kDa protein degradation reaction. The preparations will be evaluated based on their ability to permit light dependent degradation of the 32kDa protein without affecting the other membrane components.},
doi = {},
journal = {Plant Physiology, Supplement; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 89:4,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}
  • A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. Amore » significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance.« less
  • Strong illumination of oxygen-evolving organisms inhibits the electron transport through photosystem II (photoinhibition). In addition the illumination leads to a rapid turnover of the D1 protein in the reaction center of photosystem II. In this study the light-dependent degradation of the D1 reaction center protein and the light-dependent inhibition of electron-transport reactions have been studied in thylakoid membranes in which the oxygen evolution has been reversibly inhibited by Cl- depletion. The results show that Cl(-)-depleted thylakoid membranes are very vulnerable to damage induced by illumination. Both the D1 protein and the inhibition of the oxygen evolution are 15-20 times moremore » sensitive to illumination than in control thylakoid membranes. The presence, during the illumination, of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) prevented both the light-dependent degradation of the D1 protein and the inhibition of the electron transport. The protection exerted by DCMU is seen only in Cl(-)-depleted thylakoid membranes. These observations lead to the proposal that continuous illumination of Cl(-)-depleted thylakoid membranes generates anomalously long-lived, highly oxidizing radicals on the oxidizing side of photosystem II, which are responsible for the light-induced protein damage and inhibition. The presence of DCMU during the illumination prevents the formation of these radicals, which explains the protective effects of the herbicide. It is also observed that in Cl(-)-depleted thylakoid membranes, oxygen evolution (measured after the readdition of Cl-) is inhibited before electron transfer from diphenylcarbazide to dichlorophenolindophenol.« less
  • The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing ofmore » an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.« less