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Title: Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

Abstract

Lungs from 46 autopsied children (age range, 1 to 27 months) were examined for asbestos bodies using a bleach-digestion extraction technique. Ten (21.7%) of 46 children had asbestos bodies in their lungs. Of these ten children, seven were diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome, and three were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Thus, 46.6% of children with sudden infant death syndrome and 42.8% of children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia had asbestos bodies. Impaired lung-clearing mechanisms due to either abnormal lung physiology or reorganization of pulmonary architecture may be significant in the formation of asbestos bodies. Additionally, children with asbestos bodies may have been exposed to higher ambient levels of asbestos and other pollutants.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7024772
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Arch. Pathol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 112:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ASBESTOS; LUNG CLEARANCE; TOXICITY; CHILDREN; SENSITIVITY; AIR POLLUTION; AUTOPSY; DEATH; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; INHIBITION; LUNGS; AGE GROUPS; BODY; CLEARANCE; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; EXCRETION; ORGANS; POLLUTION; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Haque, A.K., and Kanz, M.F. Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Haque, A.K., & Kanz, M.F. Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. United States.
Haque, A.K., and Kanz, M.F. 1988. "Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7024772,
title = {Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia},
author = {Haque, A.K. and Kanz, M.F.},
abstractNote = {Lungs from 46 autopsied children (age range, 1 to 27 months) were examined for asbestos bodies using a bleach-digestion extraction technique. Ten (21.7%) of 46 children had asbestos bodies in their lungs. Of these ten children, seven were diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome, and three were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Thus, 46.6% of children with sudden infant death syndrome and 42.8% of children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia had asbestos bodies. Impaired lung-clearing mechanisms due to either abnormal lung physiology or reorganization of pulmonary architecture may be significant in the formation of asbestos bodies. Additionally, children with asbestos bodies may have been exposed to higher ambient levels of asbestos and other pollutants.},
doi = {},
journal = {Arch. Pathol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 112:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 5
}
  • Lungs from 46 autopsied children (age range, 1 to 27 months) were examined for asbestos bodies using a bleach-digestion extraction technique. Ten (21.7%) of 46 children had asbestos bodies in their lungs. Of these ten children, seven were diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome, and three were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Thus, 46.6% of children with sudden infant death syndrome and 42.8% of children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia had asbestos bodies. Impaired lung-clearing mechanisms due to either abnormal lung physiology or reorganization of pulmonary architecture may be significant in the formation of asbestos bodies. Additionally, children with asbestos bodies may havemore » been exposed to higher ambient levels of asbestos and other pollutants.« less
  • Evidence that chronic hypoxia precedes death from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is mounting. Prolonged exposure to moderate levels of pollutants could be a contributing factor to hypoxia. Levels of carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and hydrocarbons (HC) are highest in the winter when incidence of SIDS is increased. SIDS cases in Los Angeles County were correlated with daily mean levels of these pollutants, temperature, barometric pressure and monthly lead levels with the aid of time series analyses. Peaks in CO, SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, HC and lead preceded the seasonal increase in SIDSmore » by seven weeks. Theoretical considerations, such as the hypoxia-inducing effects of CO, support the hypothesis that this temporal relation has functional significance. The role of pollution levels as a predisposing factor in risk for SIDS cannot be summarily dismissed.« less
  • It is postulated that nicotine, as the main neurotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke, influences SIDS risk through effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal. This study compared {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChR subunit expression in eight nuclei of the caudal and rostral medulla and seven nuclei of the pons between SIDS (n = 46) and non-SIDS infants (n = 14). Evaluation for associations with known SIDS risk factors included comparison according to whether infants had a history of exposure to cigarette smoke in the home, and stratification for sleep position and gender. Compared tomore » non-SIDS infants, SIDS infants had significantly decreased {alpha}7 in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS), gracile and cuneate nuclei, with decreased {beta}2 in the cNTS and increased {beta}2 in the facial. When considering only the SIDS cohort: 1-cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased {alpha}7 in the vestibular nucleus and increased {beta}2 in the rostral dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, rNTS and Cuneate, 2-there was a gender interaction for {alpha}7 in the gracile and cuneate, and {beta}2 in the cNTS and rostral arcuate nucleus, and 3-there was no effect of sleep position on {alpha}7, but prone sleep was associated with decreased {beta}2 in three nuclei of the pons. In conclusion, SIDS infants demonstrate differences in expression of {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChRs within brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal, which is independent on prior history of cigarette smoke exposure, especially for the NTS, with additional differences for smoke exposure ({beta}2), gender ({alpha}7 and {beta}2) and sleep position ({beta}2) evident. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 'normal' response to smoke exposure is decreased {alpha}7 and {beta}2 in certain nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIDS infants have decreased {alpha}7 in cNTS, Grac and Cun. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIDS infants have decreased {beta}2 in cNTS and increased {beta}2 in facial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTS is more sensitive to both {alpha}7 and {beta}2 regulation in SIDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smoke exposure amongst SIDS induces a different response; increased {alpha}7 and {beta}2.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was any evidence of an excess of the toxic elements, cadmium and lead, or a deficiency of any of the essential elements, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc, in the tissues of infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) as compared to those of infants who died of other causes. The literature was reviewed for SIDS, mineral metabolism, and mineral interactions. Lung, liver, kidney, and rib specimens were obtained at autopsy from 130 infants who died suddenly and unexpectedly. There were 85 SIDS cases ranging in age from 2more » to 64 weeks and 45, aged 1 to 92 weeks, who died of other causes. Concentrations of cadmium, lead, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc in each tissue were determined by electrothermal and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Statistical analysis of the data showed that liver and rib lead concentrations and liver magnesium concentrations were significantly higher in SIDS tissues in the 4 to 26 week age group than in non-SIDS tissues in the same age group. There was no evidence of a deficiency of the essential minerals measured.« less