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Title: Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report

Abstract

A pilot exposure study was conducted to determine whether the consumption of fish captured in Lake Coeur d'Alene (LCD), the Coeur d'Alene River, and the adjacent Chain Lakes, could substantially increase lead and cadmium levels in human blood and urine. The goals of the study were: to characterize fish and duck consumption patterns of people living around LCD; and to determine the association between fish and duck consumption and lead/cadmium levels. The lead and cadmium levels among participants living near LCD were within the expected range and are not of any known clinical importance. After adjusting for age and smoking, it was found that persons eating fish or duck were more likely to have higher than the median levels of cadmium in their urine. There were no statistically significant associations between fish or duck consumption and blood levels of lead or cadmium or urine levels of cadmium when adjusted for creatinine.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7017109
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7017109
Report Number(s):
PB-90-219320/XAB; ATSDR/HS--90/08
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CADMIUM; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; FISHES; CONTAMINATION; FOOD CHAINS; IDAHO; WATER POLLUTION; LEAD; CREATININE; HEALTH HAZARDS; MAN; METABOLISM; PROGRESS REPORT; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; AZOLES; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION X; HAZARDS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; IMIDAZOLES; IMINES; MAMMALS; METALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; PRIMATES; USA; VERTEBRATES 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Richter, B.S., and Rondinelli, R. Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Richter, B.S., & Rondinelli, R. Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report. United States.
Richter, B.S., and Rondinelli, R. Fri . "Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7017109,
title = {Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report},
author = {Richter, B.S. and Rondinelli, R.},
abstractNote = {A pilot exposure study was conducted to determine whether the consumption of fish captured in Lake Coeur d'Alene (LCD), the Coeur d'Alene River, and the adjacent Chain Lakes, could substantially increase lead and cadmium levels in human blood and urine. The goals of the study were: to characterize fish and duck consumption patterns of people living around LCD; and to determine the association between fish and duck consumption and lead/cadmium levels. The lead and cadmium levels among participants living near LCD were within the expected range and are not of any known clinical importance. After adjusting for age and smoking, it was found that persons eating fish or duck were more likely to have higher than the median levels of cadmium in their urine. There were no statistically significant associations between fish or duck consumption and blood levels of lead or cadmium or urine levels of cadmium when adjusted for creatinine.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989}
}

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  • The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native residentmore » fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and streams after eggs are laid in the gravel. Supplementation of native fish stocks in conjunction with effective habitat restoration will be the primary means of achieving these biological goals. Overarching goals for the program include: (1) Protection, mitigation, and enhancement of Columbia River Basin native resident fish resources. (2) Develop, increase, and/or reintroduce natural spawning populations of westslope cutthroat trout into reservation waters. (3) Provide both short and long-term harvest opportunities for the reservation community. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-targeted fish populations to a minimum.« less
  • Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeurmore » d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses the overall habitat condition of the regional area (macrohabitat), restoring the native species composition, density, and diversity by restoring the native ecosystem function. In the context of the development and implementation of this Habitat Protection Plan, it is important to understand that this is primarily a conservation tool, and is not intended to displace efforts that mitigate for lost resources. This plan is intended to primarily address long-term conservation needs and may not accommodate immediate short-term needs that address lost resources. Therefore, areas selected to address short-term mitigation needs may not be located in the high priority areas identified in this Plan. It needs to be clear that these projects and areas are no less important than those identified in this Plan.« less
  • Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribemore » to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a five-year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. Since that time, much of the mitigation activities occurring within the Coeur d'Alene sub-basin have had a connection to the project entitled 'Implement of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation', which is sponsored and implemented by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program and is the subject of this report.« less
  • As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimatesmore » for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in the Rocky Mountain region. At 23 of 29 sample sites, low levels of fine sediment led to high predictions of overall embryo survival (mean = 28.4%). The estimates of fry production potential at sample sites ranged widely (0.0 to 31.2 fry/100 square meters) due, primarily, to the quantity of suitable gravels present. Only in the mainstem of Lake Creek were the proportions of both small and coarse fines considered above the levels for these particle sizes (10% and 30%, respectively) shown to adversely affect salmonid emergence success. Of the 6 sites where high levels of small or coarse fines were recorded, only the sites located in the mainstem of Lake Creek showed supporting evidence for low recruitment.« less
  • The purpose of the study is to determine the current distribution of metals loadings to the South Fork Couer d'Alene River in northern Idaho. Water quality and flow data obtained from EPA Region 10 for September 1986 and September 1987 are used to determine loadings during the low-flow season. Data from May of 1988 are used to determine loadings for the high-flow season. Total and dissolved loads of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc are calculated for the river and tributary streams. For the point-source discharges, loadings are calculated using average flow rates and metals concentrations as recorded onmore » monthly NPDES discharge monitoring reports. Diagrams of the South Fork River basin showing sample locations and total metal loadings for cadmium, lead, and zinc are compiled. Because most of the point sources of metals to the South Fork have been effectively controlled, water quality degradation in the basin is in large part a result of non-point sources and remobilization of floodplain and river bed sediment.« less