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Title: Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies

Abstract

The development of new electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies is described. The system measures the thickness of the water film and droplet size and velocity distributions which would be encountered in the annular two-phase flow in a reactor cooling system. The water film thickness is measured by a specially designed capacitance system with a short time constant. Water droplet size and velocity are measured by a subsystem consisting of a continuously pulsed laser light source, a vidicon camera, a video recorder, and an automatic image analyzer. An endoscope system attached to the video camera is used to image the droplets. Each frame is strobed with two accurately spaced uv light pulses, from two sequentially fired nitrogen lasers. The images are stored in the video disk recorder. The modified automatic image analyzer is programmed to digitize the droplet size and velocity distributions. Many special optical, mechanical and electronic system components were designed and fabricated. They are described in detail, together with calibration charts and experimental results.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
7014072
Report Number(s):
LBL-11027; CONF-801103-35
TRN: 81-001836
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE nuclear science symposium, Orlando, FL, USA, 5 Nov 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; REACTOR COOLING SYSTEMS; TWO-PHASE FLOW; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; REACTOR SAFETY; DROPLETS; FILMS; IMAGES; LASERS; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; RECORDING SYSTEMS; TELEVISION CAMERAS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; VIDICONS; WATER; ACCIDENTS; CAMERA TUBES; CAMERAS; COOLING SYSTEMS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; FLUID FLOW; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; IMAGE TUBES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PARTICLES; RADIATIONS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTORS; SAFETY; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety

Citation Formats

Turko, B.T., Kolbe, W.F., Leskovar, B., and Sun, R.K. Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Turko, B.T., Kolbe, W.F., Leskovar, B., & Sun, R.K. Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies. United States.
Turko, B.T., Kolbe, W.F., Leskovar, B., and Sun, R.K. 1980. "Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7014072.
@article{osti_7014072,
title = {Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies},
author = {Turko, B.T. and Kolbe, W.F. and Leskovar, B. and Sun, R.K.},
abstractNote = {The development of new electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies is described. The system measures the thickness of the water film and droplet size and velocity distributions which would be encountered in the annular two-phase flow in a reactor cooling system. The water film thickness is measured by a specially designed capacitance system with a short time constant. Water droplet size and velocity are measured by a subsystem consisting of a continuously pulsed laser light source, a vidicon camera, a video recorder, and an automatic image analyzer. An endoscope system attached to the video camera is used to image the droplets. Each frame is strobed with two accurately spaced uv light pulses, from two sequentially fired nitrogen lasers. The images are stored in the video disk recorder. The modified automatic image analyzer is programmed to digitize the droplet size and velocity distributions. Many special optical, mechanical and electronic system components were designed and fabricated. They are described in detail, together with calibration charts and experimental results.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month =
}

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