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Title: Coso update, November 1988

Abstract

A major upwelling zone in the Coso reservoir rises vertically to the main argillic seal and then turns and moves to the north. Navy Power Plant No. 1 is on this northern extension. Navy Power Plant No. 1 is on this northern extension. Navy Power Plant No. 2 and the BLM power plants are above the vertical upwelling zone. Geothermal wells at Coso have been completed with temperatures over 700{degree}F and operating wellhead temperatures of 480{degree}F. All 9 units at Coso are expected to be completed and on line by the end of 1989, generating a total of 230 megawatts. Gross revenue will equal about $200 million a year. The projects electrical output will be purchased by Southern California Edison under three long-term contracts of 24- to 30-years duration.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7012806
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7012806
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geothermal Hot Line; (USA); Journal Volume: 18:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; COSO HOT SPRINGS; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; CONSTRUCTION; CAPACITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; PLANNING; POWER GENERATION; RESERVOIR TEMPERATURE; SCHEDULES; WELL COMPLETION; WELL DRILLING; CALIFORNIA; DRILLING; FEDERAL REGION IX; NORTH AMERICA; POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; USA; WELLS 150500* -- Geothermal Energy-- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 150800 -- Geothermal Power Plants

Citation Formats

Not Available. Coso update, November 1988. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Not Available. Coso update, November 1988. United States.
Not Available. Thu . "Coso update, November 1988". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7012806,
title = {Coso update, November 1988},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {A major upwelling zone in the Coso reservoir rises vertically to the main argillic seal and then turns and moves to the north. Navy Power Plant No. 1 is on this northern extension. Navy Power Plant No. 1 is on this northern extension. Navy Power Plant No. 2 and the BLM power plants are above the vertical upwelling zone. Geothermal wells at Coso have been completed with temperatures over 700{degree}F and operating wellhead temperatures of 480{degree}F. All 9 units at Coso are expected to be completed and on line by the end of 1989, generating a total of 230 megawatts. Gross revenue will equal about $200 million a year. The projects electrical output will be purchased by Southern California Edison under three long-term contracts of 24- to 30-years duration.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geothermal Hot Line; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 18:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1988},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1988}
}
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