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Title: Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method (in Chinese)

Abstract

Furfural production by hydrolysis of fibrous plant materials is accompanied by formation of acetic acid in amounts depending on the material used. The amount of acetic formed in the hydrolysis of the fruit shell of oil-tea camellia (Camellia oleosa) (an oilseed-bearing tree) is equal to the amount of furfural. The acetic acid can be separated from the furfural and concentrated to 10% by electrodialysis. A smaller amount of furfural is separated with acetic acid.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Design and Research Inst Forest Products Industries, Chaonei St, Peking, China
OSTI Identifier:
7010952
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: For. Prod. J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
Chinese
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; FURFURAL; PRODUCTION; WOOD; HYDROLYSIS; ACETIC ACID; ELECTRODIALYSIS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TREES; ALDEHYDES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DIALYSIS; FURANS; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; LYSIS; MONOCARBOXYLIC ACIDS; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; SOLVOLYSIS 140504* -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Guan, S.F., Li, C.S. Ye, S.T., Shen, S.Y., Wang, Y.T., and Yu, S.H. Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Guan, S.F., Li, C.S. Ye, S.T., Shen, S.Y., Wang, Y.T., & Yu, S.H. Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method. United States.
Guan, S.F., Li, C.S. Ye, S.T., Shen, S.Y., Wang, Y.T., and Yu, S.H. 1981. "Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7010952,
title = {Separating acetic acid from furol (furfural) by electrodialysis method},
author = {Guan, S.F. and Li, C.S. Ye, S.T. and Shen, S.Y. and Wang, Y.T. and Yu, S.H.},
abstractNote = {Furfural production by hydrolysis of fibrous plant materials is accompanied by formation of acetic acid in amounts depending on the material used. The amount of acetic formed in the hydrolysis of the fruit shell of oil-tea camellia (Camellia oleosa) (an oilseed-bearing tree) is equal to the amount of furfural. The acetic acid can be separated from the furfural and concentrated to 10% by electrodialysis. A smaller amount of furfural is separated with acetic acid.},
doi = {},
journal = {For. Prod. J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 1
}
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