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Title: Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run

Abstract

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing conveyed perforating (TCP), underbalanced perforating, high shot density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems are some of the developments that have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development, described in this paper, is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements during a perforating run and has the capability of selectively firing a number of guns at different depths or times. These measurements include pressure, flow rate, temperature, GR, CCL, and cable tension. The simultaneous downhole measurements, in addition to providing better control of the perforating process, can in a single trip provide a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Schlumberger Perforating and Testing Center
OSTI Identifier:
7004953
Report Number(s):
CONF-861080-
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Society of Petroleum Engineers annual technical conference and exhibition, New Orleans, LA, USA, 5 Oct 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS WELLS; PERFORATION; OIL WELLS; CABLES; EVALUATION; EXPLOSIVES; FLOW RATE; FLUID FLOW; GAMMA LOGGING; GUNS; OPERATION; PERFORMANCE TESTING; PRODUCTION; SAFETY; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; TUBES; USES; VAPOR PRESSURE; WELL COMPLETION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; RADIOACTIVITY LOGGING; TESTING; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; WELL LOGGING; WELLS 020300* -- Petroleum-- Drilling & Production; 030300 -- Natural Gas-- Drilling, Production, & Processing

Citation Formats

Tariq, S.M., and Ayestaran, L. Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Tariq, S.M., & Ayestaran, L. Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run. United States.
Tariq, S.M., and Ayestaran, L. 1986. "Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7004953,
title = {Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run},
author = {Tariq, S.M. and Ayestaran, L.},
abstractNote = {Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing conveyed perforating (TCP), underbalanced perforating, high shot density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems are some of the developments that have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development, described in this paper, is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements during a perforating run and has the capability of selectively firing a number of guns at different depths or times. These measurements include pressure, flow rate, temperature, GR, CCL, and cable tension. The simultaneous downhole measurements, in addition to providing better control of the perforating process, can in a single trip provide a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing-conveyed perforating, underbalanced perforating, high-shot-density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development described in this paper is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements (including pressure, flow rate, temperature, gamma ray, casing-collar locator (CCL), and cable tension) during a perforating run and can selectively fire a number of guns at different depths or times. In addition to providing better control of the perforating process, the simultaneous downhole measurements can provide in a singlemore » trip a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions. Thus, the completion can be evaluated in real time and any needed remedial reperforating can be performed while the gun is still in the hole. Other applications include limited-entry perforating, monitoring of bottomhole pressure (BHP) during minifracture jobs, better depth control with a gamma ray detector, fluid-level monitoring, and underbalance control. The applications of these measurements, with field data obtained with the Measurement While Perforating (MWP{sup SM}) tool, are the subject of this paper. Examples show the capabilities and the versatility of the MWP tool.« less
  • Recently developed pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) tools are used to collect reliable downhole measurements in geothermal systems, such as at The Geysers. PTS surveys in several flowing Geysers steam wells were used to quantify steam entry location and magnitude, wellbore heat loss, pressure drop due to friction, thermodynamic properties of the steam, and maximum rock temperature. Interwell cross flow/interference was identified in one well. Finally, a single-phase saturated steam wellbore model used to compare calculated to measured downhole values, was found to adequately predict the flowing pressure versus depth curves in vapor filled holes.
  • A bioventing project was performed at a natural gas processing plant site in west central Alberta, where a light, nonaqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) plume of natural gas condensate covers an area of approximately 65,000 m{sup 2}. Bioventing was tested in two phases using an existing soil vapor extraction (SVE) installation. The first phase was a flowrate variation test, during August 1993 to November 1993. The blower extraction rate was varied to determine the optimum air extraction rate at which biodegradation was maintained and volatilization was minimized, in order to reduce potential off-gas treatment costs. At the lowest extraction rate of 24more » L/s the hydrocarbon mass removed due to biodegradation was 50 kg/day, with only 4 kg/day of extracted off-gas. The second phase of the test consisted of respiration testing from December 1993 to May 1994 to monitor biodegradation rates during winter. It is widely believed that biodegradation rates drop at low temperatures. However, the biodegradation rate was relatively high during the winter, averaging 20 mg of hydrocarbon/kg of soil per day, at in situ temperatures of 5 to 8 C.« less
  • Pressure and temperature sensors in the annulus can furnish a large amount of information on the physical phenomena occurring during primary cementing. Pressure in a cement column in a well normally begins to decline shortly after the pumping of the cement is completed. The effectiveness of applied surface pressure to prevent the pressure decline in cement depends on the rate at which the gel strength of the cement develops. When the annular cement pressure measurement drops to pore pressure in a zone and stabilizes at this value before the cement sets this indicates fluid entering the wellbore. Pressure sensors canmore » detect fluid communication in the annulus when the well is perforated, squeeze-cemented, or acidized, and can be used to investigate completion or workover operations in the well. The top-of-cement at the completion of pumping can be estimated from pressure data. The volume of mud bypassed by the cement can approximate the volume of the hole in excess of bit size. The time of the final setting of the cement at different depths in a well can be detected by annular temperature measurements. Cement generally sets from the bottom of the wellbore upward, because of the higher temperatures at lower depths or because of the shorter thickening times of tail slurries.« less
  • This paper investigates the causes of fluid migration behind the well casing after primary cementing through methods of pressure and temperature measurement in the annulus of seven wells during cementing operations. A variety of logging methods are used. The pressure data resulting from these measurements could be used to determine conditions that either prevented or allowed fluid entry into the wellbore. The temperature measurements in the annulus were used to monitor the setting of the cement and the accompanying evolution of heat. These field data confirm laboratory data that show a pressure decline in a cement column as the cementmore » cures. Conditions more likely to lead to annular fluid migration before the cement sets and steps that can be taken to decrease the likelihood of these occurrences can be identified from the field results. The acronym FILAP is suggested for the phenomenon of flow induced by the loss of annular pressure.« less