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Title: Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis]

Abstract

Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than weremore » both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Bowling Green State Univ., OH (USA)
  2. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6991620
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Bacteriology; (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 171:4; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9193
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; BACTERIA; MORTALITY; OXYGEN; TOXICITY; CAROTENOIDS; CELL KILLING; ESCHERICHIA COLI; GLUTATHIONE; SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM; STAPHYLOCOCCUS; STREPTOCOCCUS; TOLERANCE; DRUGS; ELEMENTS; HYDROCARBONS; MICROORGANISMS; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PEPTIDES; PIGMENTS; POLYPEPTIDES; PROTEINS; RADIOPROTECTIVE SUBSTANCES; SALMONELLA; TERPENES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Dahl, T A, Midden, W R, and Hartman, P E. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis]. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Dahl, T A, Midden, W R, & Hartman, P E. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis]. United States.
Dahl, T A, Midden, W R, and Hartman, P E. Sat . "Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis]". United States.
@article{osti_6991620,
title = {Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis]},
author = {Dahl, T A and Midden, W R and Hartman, P E},
abstractNote = {Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Bacteriology; (USA)},
issn = {0021-9193},
number = ,
volume = 171:4,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {4}
}