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Title: Negative ion formation processes: A general review

Abstract

The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
6990646
Report Number(s):
CONF-900289-4
ON: DE90009809; TRN: 90-010398
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International workshop on the polarized ion sources and polarized gas jets, Tsukuba-Shi (Japan), 12-17 Feb 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ION SOURCES; DESIGN; AFFINITY; ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION; ANIONS; CAPTURE; DISSOCIATION; ELECTRON TRANSFER; ION BEAMS; IONIZATION; SPUTTERING; SURFACES; THERMAL EQUILIBRIUM; WORK FUNCTIONS; BEAMS; CHARGED PARTICLES; DISTRIBUTION; EQUILIBRIUM; FUNCTIONS; IONS; 640301* - Atomic, Molecular & Chemical Physics- Beams & their Reactions; 430301 - Particle Accelerators- Ion Sources

Citation Formats

Alton, G.D.. Negative ion formation processes: A general review. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Alton, G.D.. Negative ion formation processes: A general review. United States.
Alton, G.D.. 1990. "Negative ion formation processes: A general review". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6990646.
@article{osti_6990646,
title = {Negative ion formation processes: A general review},
author = {Alton, G.D.},
abstractNote = {The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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