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Title: Interpretive model for ''A Concurrency Method''

Abstract

This paper describes an interpreter for ''A Concurrency Method,'' in which concurrency is the inherent mode of operation and not an appendage to sequentiality. This method is based on the notions of data-drive and single-assignment while preserving a natural manner of programming. The interpreter is designed for and implemented on a network of Corvus Concept Personal Workstations, which are based on the Motorola MC68000 super-microcomputer. The interpreter utilizes the MC68000 processors in each workstation by communicating across OMNINET, the local area network designed for the workstations. The interpreter is a complete system, containing an editor, a compiler, an operating system with load balancer, and a communication facility. The system includes the basic arithmetic and trigonometric primitive operations for mathematical computations as well as the ability to construct more complex operations from these. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6989670
Report Number(s):
SAND-86-0586C; CONF-870208-1
ON: DE86012655
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6. annual IEEE Phoenix conference on computers and communications, Scottsdale, AZ, USA, 25 Feb 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER NETWORKS; EXECUTIVE CODES; MATHEMATICS; PERSONAL COMPUTERS; TEXT EDITORS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERS; DIGITAL COMPUTERS; 990220* - Computers, Computerized Models, & Computer Programs- (1987-1989)

Citation Formats

Carter, C.L. Interpretive model for ''A Concurrency Method''. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Carter, C.L. Interpretive model for ''A Concurrency Method''. United States.
Carter, C.L. 1987. "Interpretive model for ''A Concurrency Method''". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6989670,
title = {Interpretive model for ''A Concurrency Method''},
author = {Carter, C.L.},
abstractNote = {This paper describes an interpreter for ''A Concurrency Method,'' in which concurrency is the inherent mode of operation and not an appendage to sequentiality. This method is based on the notions of data-drive and single-assignment while preserving a natural manner of programming. The interpreter is designed for and implemented on a network of Corvus Concept Personal Workstations, which are based on the Motorola MC68000 super-microcomputer. The interpreter utilizes the MC68000 processors in each workstation by communicating across OMNINET, the local area network designed for the workstations. The interpreter is a complete system, containing an editor, a compiler, an operating system with load balancer, and a communication facility. The system includes the basic arithmetic and trigonometric primitive operations for mathematical computations as well as the ability to construct more complex operations from these. 9 refs., 5 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • ''A Concurrency Method'' is a language embodying the data flow characteristics of data-drive and single-assignment. The interpreter for ''A Concurrency Method'' models a physical machine with an architecture directed toward this language. The interpreter is a complete system with scheduler, editor, load balancer and message handler. This model embraces some architectural features in other data flow machines and models and combines these features in a manner most conducive to this language. 9 refs., 5 figs.
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  • The author deals with a new mechanism called structured control flow (SCF) for specifying change of control in von-Neumann type computer architectures. It relies on the structured nature of modern algorithmic high level languages by retaining the control structure at the machine code level. In retaining this structure, all explicit branch instructions are eliminated at the cost of fewer instructions for the structure specification. SCF can be used in a sequential implementation to reduce the pipeline delay due to branches while maintaining a closer correspondence between the source code and machine representation. Using SCF in a concurrent implementation allows themore » detection of additional concurrency not available using a conventional machine representation. 12 references.« less