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Title: Effects of nonmethane hydrocarbons on lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric chemical climatology in a two-dimensional zonal average model

Abstract

The effect on the modeled chemical climatology of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere of including a limited set of nonmethane hydrocarbons in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonal average model is presented. Recent measurements of nitrogenated and oxygenated hydrocarbons in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere have revealed the possibility of significant perturbation of this region. A zonally averaged 2-D chemical transport model enhanced to represent tropospheric processes was used to explore the extent of this perturbation on global and regional spatial scales and on seasonal and annual average timescales. Acetone was shown to cause a significant increase in the HO{sub x} budgets of the upper troposphere in the midlatitude Northern Hemisphere during the winter and early spring months, with acetone photolysis providing the most significant source of HO{sub x} radicals. The tropical upper troposphere has a uniform increase in HO{sub x} of up to 20{percent} throughout the year because of acetone photolysis. Including the hydrocarbons caused a net increase in ozone of 5 ppbv in the lower and middle troposphere and 5{endash}10 ppbv in the upper troposphere for global and annual averages. The effect of including the hydrocarbons on the calculated model ozone response for the case of doubled surfacemore » mixing ratios of atmospheric CH{sub 4} is also discussed. It is shown that including hydrocarbons in the model has a significant effect on the modeled ozone response to the methane increase. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Environmental Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)
  2. Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
698897
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: D17; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CLIMATE MODELS; HYDROCARBONS; AIR POLLUTION; OZONE; MIXING

Citation Formats

Kotamarthi, V.R., Wuebbles, D.J., and Reck, R.A. Effects of nonmethane hydrocarbons on lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric chemical climatology in a two-dimensional zonal average model. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1029/1999JD900334.
Kotamarthi, V.R., Wuebbles, D.J., & Reck, R.A. Effects of nonmethane hydrocarbons on lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric chemical climatology in a two-dimensional zonal average model. United States. doi:10.1029/1999JD900334.
Kotamarthi, V.R., Wuebbles, D.J., and Reck, R.A. Wed . "Effects of nonmethane hydrocarbons on lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric chemical climatology in a two-dimensional zonal average model". United States. doi:10.1029/1999JD900334.
@article{osti_698897,
title = {Effects of nonmethane hydrocarbons on lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric chemical climatology in a two-dimensional zonal average model},
author = {Kotamarthi, V.R. and Wuebbles, D.J. and Reck, R.A.},
abstractNote = {The effect on the modeled chemical climatology of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere of including a limited set of nonmethane hydrocarbons in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonal average model is presented. Recent measurements of nitrogenated and oxygenated hydrocarbons in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere have revealed the possibility of significant perturbation of this region. A zonally averaged 2-D chemical transport model enhanced to represent tropospheric processes was used to explore the extent of this perturbation on global and regional spatial scales and on seasonal and annual average timescales. Acetone was shown to cause a significant increase in the HO{sub x} budgets of the upper troposphere in the midlatitude Northern Hemisphere during the winter and early spring months, with acetone photolysis providing the most significant source of HO{sub x} radicals. The tropical upper troposphere has a uniform increase in HO{sub x} of up to 20{percent} throughout the year because of acetone photolysis. Including the hydrocarbons caused a net increase in ozone of 5 ppbv in the lower and middle troposphere and 5{endash}10 ppbv in the upper troposphere for global and annual averages. The effect of including the hydrocarbons on the calculated model ozone response for the case of doubled surface mixing ratios of atmospheric CH{sub 4} is also discussed. It is shown that including hydrocarbons in the model has a significant effect on the modeled ozone response to the methane increase. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union},
doi = {10.1029/1999JD900334},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
number = D17,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}