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Title: Innovative traffic control: Technology practice in Europe. International technology exchange program

Abstract

This summary report describes a may 1998 transportation technology scanning tour of four European countries. The tour was co-sponsored by FHWA, AASHTO, and TRB. The tour team consisted of 10 traffic engineers who visited England, France, Germany, and Sweden to observe traffic control devices and methodology and to determine if any European practices should and could be recommended for use in the United States. This report is organized into five key chapters: Traffic Control Devices, Freeway Control, Operational Practices, Information Management, and Administrative Practices. Among the devices and practices recommended for further study for US adoption are specific freeway pavement markings, variable speed control, lane control signals, intelligent speed adaptation, innovative intersection control, and variable message signs that incorporate pictograms. The report includes statements for proposed research problems.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Trade Initiatives, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States); Virginia Dept. of Transportation, Richmond, VA (United States); Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR (United States); Utah Dept. of Transportation, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Federal Highway Administration, Office of International Programs, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
698760
Report Number(s):
PB-99-167629/XAB
CNN: Contract DTFH61-99-C-0005; TRN: 92851887
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; EUROPE; TRAFFIC CONTROL; ROADS; PLANNING; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Tignor, S.C., Brown, L.L., Butner, J.L., Cunard, R., and Davis, S.C. Innovative traffic control: Technology practice in Europe. International technology exchange program. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Tignor, S.C., Brown, L.L., Butner, J.L., Cunard, R., & Davis, S.C. Innovative traffic control: Technology practice in Europe. International technology exchange program. United States.
Tignor, S.C., Brown, L.L., Butner, J.L., Cunard, R., and Davis, S.C. 1999. "Innovative traffic control: Technology practice in Europe. International technology exchange program". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_698760,
title = {Innovative traffic control: Technology practice in Europe. International technology exchange program},
author = {Tignor, S.C. and Brown, L.L. and Butner, J.L. and Cunard, R. and Davis, S.C.},
abstractNote = {This summary report describes a may 1998 transportation technology scanning tour of four European countries. The tour was co-sponsored by FHWA, AASHTO, and TRB. The tour team consisted of 10 traffic engineers who visited England, France, Germany, and Sweden to observe traffic control devices and methodology and to determine if any European practices should and could be recommended for use in the United States. This report is organized into five key chapters: Traffic Control Devices, Freeway Control, Operational Practices, Information Management, and Administrative Practices. Among the devices and practices recommended for further study for US adoption are specific freeway pavement markings, variable speed control, lane control signals, intelligent speed adaptation, innovative intersection control, and variable message signs that incorporate pictograms. The report includes statements for proposed research problems.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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