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Title: Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report

Abstract

Concerns about constraints to harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) population recovery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill led biologists to ask whether birds in different molting and wintering areas belong to genetically distinct and, thus, demographically independent population segments. Genetic markers, which differed in mode of inheritance (two sex-linked Z-specific microsatellite loci, four biparentally inherited microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid sequences), were used to evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation among wintering areas within Prince William Sound, Alaska Peninsula (Katmai National Park) and Kodiak Archipelago (Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge). The authors also used colored leg bands to detect population interchange within and among these regions. The authors` genetic results show that differences in genotype frequencies among wintering locations within Alaska were low and non-significant for all three classes of markers. An analysis of genetic samples collected throughout the West Coast of North America revealed significant structuring at larger geographic scales. No interchange of banded birds was observed among regions and movements within regions were uncommon.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services, Lafayette, LA (United States); Alaska Biological Sciences Center, Biological Resources Div., Anchorage, AK (United States); Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife, East Lansing, MI (United States); Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, Anchorage, AK (United States); Geological Survey, Alaska Biological Sciences Center, Anchorage, AK (United States); National Biological Survey, Southern Science Center, Lafayette, LA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
698728
Report Number(s):
PB-99-168858/XAB
TRN: 92851907
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; DUCKS; HABITAT; POPULATION DYNAMICS; OIL SPILLS; ALASKA; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; SPECIES DIVERSITY; GENETICS

Citation Formats

Goatcher, B, Zwiefelhofer, D, Lanctot, R, Talbot, S, and Pierson, B. Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Goatcher, B, Zwiefelhofer, D, Lanctot, R, Talbot, S, & Pierson, B. Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report. United States.
Goatcher, B, Zwiefelhofer, D, Lanctot, R, Talbot, S, and Pierson, B. Thu . "Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report". United States.
@article{osti_698728,
title = {Differentiation and interchange of harlequin duck populations within the North Pacific. Restoration project 97161: Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project -- Final report},
author = {Goatcher, B and Zwiefelhofer, D and Lanctot, R and Talbot, S and Pierson, B},
abstractNote = {Concerns about constraints to harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) population recovery following the Exxon Valdez oil spill led biologists to ask whether birds in different molting and wintering areas belong to genetically distinct and, thus, demographically independent population segments. Genetic markers, which differed in mode of inheritance (two sex-linked Z-specific microsatellite loci, four biparentally inherited microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid sequences), were used to evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation among wintering areas within Prince William Sound, Alaska Peninsula (Katmai National Park) and Kodiak Archipelago (Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge). The authors also used colored leg bands to detect population interchange within and among these regions. The authors` genetic results show that differences in genotype frequencies among wintering locations within Alaska were low and non-significant for all three classes of markers. An analysis of genetic samples collected throughout the West Coast of North America revealed significant structuring at larger geographic scales. No interchange of banded birds was observed among regions and movements within regions were uncommon.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/698728}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {4}
}

Technical Report:
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