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Title: Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

Abstract

There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries ismore » critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Breeze International Environmental, Clayton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
69867
Report Number(s):
CONF-941189-
ISBN 1-56590-016-2; TRN: IM9529%%255
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SUPERFUND XV: 15th environmental conference and exhibition for the hazardous materials/hazardous waste management industry, Washington, DC (United States), 29 Nov - 1 Dec 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Superfund XV conference proceedings. Volume 2; PB: 877 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; TRAINING; ACCIDENTS

Citation Formats

Braithwaite, J. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Braithwaite, J. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries. United States.
Braithwaite, J. Sat . "Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_69867,
title = {Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries},
author = {Braithwaite, J.},
abstractNote = {There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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