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Title: Activation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle by phospholipase C and phorbol ester. Evaluation of the regulatory roles of protein kinase C and calcium

Abstract

It has been hypothesized on the basis of studies on BC3H-1 myocytes that diacylglycerol generation with activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the stimulation of glucose transport in muscle by insulin. In the present study, we used the rat epitrochlearis muscle to evaluate the possibility that PKC activity mediates the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin in mammalian skeletal muscle. Phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens (PLC-Cp), which generates diacylglycerol from membrane phospholipids, and 4 beta-phorbol 12 beta-myristate 13 alpha-acetate (PMA) induced increases in glucose transport activity (assessed using 3-O-methylglucose transport) that were approximately 80 and approximately 20% as great, respectively, as that induced by a maximal insulin stimulus. PLC-Cp and PMA both caused a approximately 2-fold increase in membrane-associated PKC activity. In contrast, insulin did not affect PKC activity. These findings argue against a role of diacylglycerol-mediated PKC activation in the stimulation of skeletal muscle glucose transport by insulin. They also show that the BC3H-1 myocyte is not a good model for studying regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Neither the submaximal nor maximal effects of PLC-Cp and insulin on glucose transport were additive, suggesting that PLC-Cp interferes with insulin action. The maximal effects of PLC-Cpmore » and hypoxia or muscle contractions were also not additive. However, the submaximal effects of hypoxia and PLC-Cp were completely additive. These findings raise the possibility that PLC-Cp stimulates glucose transport by the exercise/hypoxia-activated, not the insulin-activated, pathway in skeletal muscle.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6982954
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Biological Chemistry; (USA); Journal Volume: 264:36
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GLUCOSE; MEMBRANE TRANSPORT; INSULIN; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; PHORBOL ESTERS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; ANOXIA; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; CALCIUM; CONTRACTION; IN VITRO; MUSCLES; RATS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRITIUM COMPOUNDS; ALDEHYDES; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; ANIMALS; CARBOHYDRATES; CARCINOGENS; ELEMENTS; ENZYMES; ESTERS; FUNCTIONS; HEXOSES; HORMONES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; KINETICS; MAMMALS; METALS; MONOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PEPTIDE HORMONES; PHOSPHORUS-GROUP TRANSFERASES; REACTION KINETICS; RODENTS; SACCHARIDES; TRANSFERASES; VERTEBRATES 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 550501 -- Metabolism-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Henriksen, E.J., Rodnick, K.J., and Holloszy, J.O. Activation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle by phospholipase C and phorbol ester. Evaluation of the regulatory roles of protein kinase C and calcium. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Henriksen, E.J., Rodnick, K.J., & Holloszy, J.O. Activation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle by phospholipase C and phorbol ester. Evaluation of the regulatory roles of protein kinase C and calcium. United States.
Henriksen, E.J., Rodnick, K.J., and Holloszy, J.O. 1989. "Activation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle by phospholipase C and phorbol ester. Evaluation of the regulatory roles of protein kinase C and calcium". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6982954,
title = {Activation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle by phospholipase C and phorbol ester. Evaluation of the regulatory roles of protein kinase C and calcium},
author = {Henriksen, E.J. and Rodnick, K.J. and Holloszy, J.O.},
abstractNote = {It has been hypothesized on the basis of studies on BC3H-1 myocytes that diacylglycerol generation with activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the stimulation of glucose transport in muscle by insulin. In the present study, we used the rat epitrochlearis muscle to evaluate the possibility that PKC activity mediates the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin in mammalian skeletal muscle. Phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens (PLC-Cp), which generates diacylglycerol from membrane phospholipids, and 4 beta-phorbol 12 beta-myristate 13 alpha-acetate (PMA) induced increases in glucose transport activity (assessed using 3-O-methylglucose transport) that were approximately 80 and approximately 20% as great, respectively, as that induced by a maximal insulin stimulus. PLC-Cp and PMA both caused a approximately 2-fold increase in membrane-associated PKC activity. In contrast, insulin did not affect PKC activity. These findings argue against a role of diacylglycerol-mediated PKC activation in the stimulation of skeletal muscle glucose transport by insulin. They also show that the BC3H-1 myocyte is not a good model for studying regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Neither the submaximal nor maximal effects of PLC-Cp and insulin on glucose transport were additive, suggesting that PLC-Cp interferes with insulin action. The maximal effects of PLC-Cp and hypoxia or muscle contractions were also not additive. However, the submaximal effects of hypoxia and PLC-Cp were completely additive. These findings raise the possibility that PLC-Cp stimulates glucose transport by the exercise/hypoxia-activated, not the insulin-activated, pathway in skeletal muscle.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 264:36,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month =
}
  • The authors are using a Rat-6 fibroblast cell line that stably overexpresses the {beta}1 isozyme of protein kinase C (PKC) to study regulation of phospholipid hydrolysis by PKC. Stimulation of control (R6-C1) or overexpressing (R6-PKC3) cells with phorbol ester results in an increase in diacylglycerol (DAG) mass with no increase in inositol phosphates, indicating that DAG is not formed by inositol phospholipid breakdown. A more dramatic DAG increase occurs in R6-PKC3 cells compared to R6-C1 cells. To further define the source of DAG, phosphatidylcholine (PC) pools were labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid or with ({sup 3}H)- or ({sup 32}P)alkyllyso-PC andmore » formation of labeled phosphatidylethanol, an unambiguous marker of phospholipase D activation, was monitored. Phorbol ester-stimulated phosphatidylethanel formation is 5-fold greater in the R6-PKC3 cell line. Formation of radiolabeled phosphatidic acid (PA) is also enhanced by PKC overepression. In cells double-labeled with ({sup 3}H)- and ({sup 32}P)-alkyl-lysoPC, the {sup 3}H/{sup 32}P ratio of PA and PC are identical 15 min after stimulation, suggesting that a phospholipase D mechanism predominates. These results indicate that phospholipase D is regulated by the action of PKC. Enhanced phospholipase D activity may contribute to the growth abnormalities seen in PKC-overexpressing cells.« less
  • When added to rat parotid gland slices incubated in vitro, 4 alpha-phorbol-dibutyrate (PDBu) induced a dose-dependent increase in protein secretion, but did not affect membrane permeability to K+ (as determined by /sup 86/Rb efflux). The response to PDBu was unaffected by the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and was not markedly potentiated by incubation with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, methylisobutylxanthine. PDBu did not activate phospholipase C breakdown of inositol lipids as shown by a failure to increase formation of soluble inositol phosphates. When applied in combination with the Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin, a secretory rate was obtained that was greater than the predictedmore » sum of rates obtained when the two drugs were given alone. These results, when taken with the reported results of others, are consistent with an action of PDBu in activating protein kinase C and suggest that this enzyme plays an important role in the pathway linking receptor activation to protein secretion, but not K+ flux, in the parotid gland.« less
  • The type II{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII{sub {beta}}) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII{sub {beta}} antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII{sub {beta}} antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. Thismore » loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII{sub {beta}} protein. Exposure to RII{sub {beta}} sense, RI{sub {alpha}} and RII{sub {alpha}} antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells.« less
  • Phorbol esters bind to and activate a calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (C kinase). Some researchers believe that activation of C kinase is necessary for the induction of phorbol ester biologic effects. The authors' research indicates that bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone that binds to the phorbol ester receptor in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, also binds to this receptor in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Bryostatin activates partially purified C kinase from HL-60 cells in vitro, and when applied to HL-60 cells in vivo, it decreases measurable cytoplasmic C kinase activity. Unlike the phorbol esters, bryostatin is unable to induce amore » macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells; however, bryostatin, in a dose-dependent fashion, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells and, if applied within 48 hr of phorbol esters, halts further differentiation. These results suggest that activation of the C kinase by some agents is not sufficient for induction of HL-60 cell differentiation and imply that some of the biologic effects of phorbol esters may occur through a more complex mechanism than previously thought.« less
  • DNA topoisomerase II from Drosophila was phosphorylated effectively by protein kinase C. With a K/sub m/ of about 100 nM, the reaction was rapid, occurring at 4/sup 0/C as well as at 30/sup 0/C and requiring as little as 0.6 ng of the protein kinase per 170 ng of topoisomerase. About 0.85 mol of phosphate could be incorporated per mol of topoisomerase II, with phosphoserine as the only phospho amino acid produced. The reaction was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine and was stimulated by phorbol esters. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, but not cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, was alsomore » able to phosphorylate the topoisomerase. Phosphorylation of topoisomerase II by protein kinase C resulted in appreciable activation of the topoisomerase, suggesting that it may represent a possible target for the regulation of nuclear events by protein kinase C. This possibility is supported by the finding that the phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells was blocked by the topoisomerase II inhibitors novobiocin and 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), but not by the inactive analog o-AMSA.« less