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Title: Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills

Abstract

At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6980507
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Sources; (United States); Journal Volume: 14:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; BAGASSE; DRYING; COGENERATION; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; PLANNING; ELECTRIC POWER; SUPPLY AND DEMAND; SUGAR INDUSTRY; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; THAILAND; RESOURCE POTENTIAL; ENERGY CONVERSION; ENERGY SOURCES; FORECASTING; OPERATING COST; POWER GENERATION; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; ASIA; CONVERSION; COST; DEUS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; INDUSTRY; ORGANIC WASTES; POWER; STEAM GENERATION; WASTES; 320304* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Industrial & Agricultural Processes- Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization; 320305 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Industrial & Agricultural Processes- Industrial Waste Management; 200105 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Heat Utilization; 093000 - Biomass Fuels- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Therdyothin, A., Bhattacharaya, S.C., and Chirarattananon, S.. Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.1080/00908319208908733.
Therdyothin, A., Bhattacharaya, S.C., & Chirarattananon, S.. Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills. United States. doi:10.1080/00908319208908733.
Therdyothin, A., Bhattacharaya, S.C., and Chirarattananon, S.. 1992. "Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills". United States. doi:10.1080/00908319208908733.
@article{osti_6980507,
title = {Electricity generation potential of Thai sugar mills},
author = {Therdyothin, A. and Bhattacharaya, S.C. and Chirarattananon, S.},
abstractNote = {At present, the total installed electricity generating capacity of Thailand is 7500 MW. Because this level of investment will take an unacceptable large part of total foreign borrowing, the government plans to encourage participation of the private sector in electricity generation. Among the various technology options for power production, cogeneration appears to be the most promising technology due to its very high effectiveness of fuel utilization. Therefore, in the first phase of private power generation, the Thai government is encouraging cogeneration systems. This paper discusses sugar mills, where expertise and equipment for electricity generation already exist, appear to be in a particularly advantageous position to participate in the private power generation program. At present, there are 46 sugar mills in Thailand with a total capacity of 338,000 tons of cane per day. The fiber part delivered from the milling of sugarcane, bagasse, is normally used to produce steam for the process heat and electricity generation. The investment and operating costs for each of these alternatives have been evaluated. The internal rate of return is used to indicate the benefit of each alternative.},
doi = {10.1080/00908319208908733},
journal = {Energy Sources; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 14:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month =
}
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