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Title: Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on und Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance

Abstract

Studies on the growth of Clostridium continued. The effects of trace minerals and a vitamin mixture, metal ions, L-proline, glycine betaine, and sodium chloride on growth and gas production were investigated. Also the effect of L-proline, and glycine betaine on sodium chloride inhibition of growth and gas production were investigated. 4 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs. (CBS)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (USA). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/FE
OSTI Identifier:
6978413
Report Number(s):
DOE/BC/10302-T2
ON: DE90009053
DOE Contract Number:
AS22-80BC10302
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CLOSTRIDIUM; CULTURE MEDIA; SODIUM CHLORIDES; TOLERANCE; GROWTH; INHIBITION; MANGANESE IONS; MICROBIAL EOR; NUTRITION; PHYSIOLOGY; PROGRESS REPORT; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; BACTERIA; CHARGED PARTICLES; CHLORIDES; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENHANCED RECOVERY; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; IONS; MICROORGANISMS; RECOVERY; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; 020300* - Petroleum- Drilling & Production; 550700 - Microbiology

Citation Formats

Grula, M.M., and Russell, H.H.. Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on und Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Grula, M.M., & Russell, H.H.. Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on und Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance. United States.
Grula, M.M., and Russell, H.H.. Thu . "Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on und Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6978413,
title = {Genetic, physiological and nutritional studies on und Clostridium strains isolated and screened for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery, with special reference to high salt tolerance},
author = {Grula, M.M. and Russell, H.H.},
abstractNote = {Studies on the growth of Clostridium continued. The effects of trace minerals and a vitamin mixture, metal ions, L-proline, glycine betaine, and sodium chloride on growth and gas production were investigated. Also the effect of L-proline, and glycine betaine on sodium chloride inhibition of growth and gas production were investigated. 4 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs. (CBS)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}

Technical Report:
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  • A number of experiments have been conducted involving various aspects of nutrition of clostridia that are related to practical considerations for downhole testing and use of the bacteria. Several strains of Clostridium have been used. The following experiments are discussed in this report: (1) comparisons of gas production by two strains of Clostridium, SEG-3 and Clostridium A under four different conditions of growth; (2) effect of sodium chloride on growth of Clostridium A in the basal semidefined medium and effects of casamino acids and ascorbate in NaCl-containing media; (3) response of six strains of clostridia to raffinose, FeSO/sub 4/, andmore » beet molasses, and production of emulsifying agents by these strains; (4) viability of SEG-3 and TSEG-3 cultures handled in different ways; (5) comparison of sucrose, pyruvate, and a mixture of the two as precursors of gas in the semidefined medium; and (6) effect of NaCl on gas production by resting cells. 9 figs., 4 tabs.« less
  • This work is concerned with a group of microorganisms generally thought to have the highest potential for usefulness in microbial enhancement of oil recovery (MEOR), namely, fermentative species of the genus Clostridium. The report consists of two parts: (1) a study of the effects of various environmental factors (mainly chemical) on growth, gas production, sporulation, and spore germination of several strains of Clostridium in laboratory media; and (2) a study of the effects of core minerals and pore volume on solvent, acid, and gas production and refeedability (in cores) of similar freshly isolated Clostridium strains. In addition, the bacterial strainsmore » were characterized, and their basic nutritional requirements were determined. 15 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.« less
  • Strains of Clostridium isolated and screened for properties thought to be useful in enhanced oil recovery have been tested for their reactions to high sodium chloride concentrations, with the ultimate goal of developing more salt-resistant strains. Gas and solvent production by certain high gas-producing strains has been tested in the presence of various pulverized cores. The minerals in these cores can enhance and prolong gas production, enhance or delay spore germination or growth and metabolism of the bacteria in situ. The presence of a source of nitrogen and of energy are essential for continued gas production. A sampling of viablemore » bacteria present in connate water, holding tanks, and other sites near oil fields showed a majority to be Gram positive, aerobic strains. For downwell work with Clostridium, beet molasses is a generally good and economical source of energy. Tests of connate water for toxicity for strain to be used, in the medium to be used, are essential. We have achieved downwell fermentations, as shown by CO/sub 2/ and solvent production, and in one case a significantly increased oil production. 10 refs., 9 figs., 23 tabs.« less
  • Results are presented on the effect of NaCl concentration on solubility of alkyl benzene sulfonates in water; effect of alkyl benzene sulfonate concentration on miscibility of a selected hydrocarbon, toluene, with water; effect of alkyl substitution on alkyl benzene sulfonates on miscibility; analogous effects of alcohol required to produce miscibility between toluene and an aqueous solution of an alkyl benzene sulfonate at a given concentration for different hydrocarbon/aqueous ratios; the effect of number of alkyl carbons, both in alkanes and in alkyl benzenes, on miscibility with a selected aqueous alkyl benzene sulfonate; and miscibilities of similar systems with mixtures ofmore » hydrocarbons. At a given protosurfactant concentration, increase in alkyl substitution on the alkyl benzene sulfonate or carboxylate increased solubilization of a hydrocarbon in the aqueous phase; in systems containing a cosurfactant, amounts of alcohol necessary to effect miscibility decreased with alkyl substitution on the organic salt. For alkyl benzene sulfonates substituted with up to four alkyl carbons, different isomers had essentially the same effect on miscibility at a given concentration; at higher degrees of substitution, differences were significant, though small. Higher concentrations of protosurfactants in most cases increased miscibility. Increasing the number of alkyl carbons of the hydrocarbon, either alkanes or phenyl alkanes, decreased miscibility. Alcohol requirements for miscibility were similar, but not identical, for alkanes and phenyl alkanes having the same number of alkyl carbons; whether more or less was required for the alkane or the corresponding phenyl alkane varied with the type of alcohol. Alcohol requirements for miscibility of hydrocarbon mixtures with aqueous protosurfactant solutions varied linearally with the weight fraction of the hydrocarbon components, other conditions being constant.« less
  • In the period of this report, studies of the hydrotropic properties of organic alkylbenzenesulfonates and particularly of alkylbenzenecarboxylates were extended; the effects of several different alcohols on miscibility between aqueous protosurfactant solutions and aliphatic and aromatic alkanes were investigated; hydrotropic properties of an alicylic carboxylate were determined; the equivalent weight of the organic salts studied was extended into the surfactant range; solubilities of protosurfactants and surfactants in salt solution were measured; and investigations of the adsorption of protosurfactants on minerals as a function of salinity were started. Pseudo three-component representations of hydrocarbon/alcohol/aqueous protosurfactant solutions (constant ratio of organic salt tomore » water) have now been studied extensively, particularly in the case of toluene/1-butanol/aqueous sodium 2,5-diisopropylbenzenesulfonate. Measurements include establishment of the phase behavior in the limiting three-component systems, the effect of protosurfactant concentration in the four-component systems, and determination of the compositions in a limited number of cases of the coexisting phases. In extension of the equivalent weight of organic salts into the recognized surfactant regime, some were found to give miscibiity patterns which appeared to be reasonable extrapolations of the protosurfactants systems and some were quite different. Solubilities of surfactants restrict investigation to compositions having asymmetric boundaries. In these, it appears that protosurfactants are more effective in promoting miscibility than surfactants. Solubilities of organic salts in NaCl solutions, both of protosurfactants and surfactants, decline much more sharply with NaCl concentration than a constant product of the sodium ion concentration times the organic ion concentration would predict.« less