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Title: Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures

Abstract

Spirulina maxima, a semi-microscopic filamentous blue-green alga, was inoculated in synthetic and waste media of different sources. The alga was evaluated for growth yield, uptake of nutrients and chemical composition. The removal rate of N and P was rapid during the first week of growth. At the end of the second week, more than 90% of the total -P and -N was removed. The mass of alga was high. The quality of the alga obtained in different media did not show much variations, except when the medium was limited in nutrients. Results indicated that Spirulina may be integrated into the effluent treatment system. Recycling waste materials not only minimizes the problem of water pollution but also revitalizes the inherently rich nutrients of waste. The biomass obtained from cultivation of Spirulina in these wastewater media may be used as a pigment-protein supplement in animal feed and as raw material for certain chemicals.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Alabama A M Univ., Normal (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6977571
Report Number(s):
CONF-9208211--
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3646; CODEN: JPYLAJ
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Phycology; (United States); Journal Volume: 28:3; Conference: 1992 meeting of the Phycological Society of America, Honolulu, HI (United States), 9-13 Aug 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ALGAE; CULTIVATION; LIQUID WASTES; RECYCLING; WASTE PROCESSING; ANIMAL FEEDS; WATER POLLUTION; FOOD; MANAGEMENT; PLANTS; POLLUTION; PROCESSING; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES 320604* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Municipalities & Community Systems-- Municipal Waste Management-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Tadros, M.G., and Phillips, J. Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Tadros, M.G., & Phillips, J. Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures. United States.
Tadros, M.G., and Phillips, J. 1992. "Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6977571,
title = {Evaluation of cyanobacteria: Spirulina maxima for growth, nutrient removal, and quality on waste-effluent media in batch cultures},
author = {Tadros, M.G. and Phillips, J.},
abstractNote = {Spirulina maxima, a semi-microscopic filamentous blue-green alga, was inoculated in synthetic and waste media of different sources. The alga was evaluated for growth yield, uptake of nutrients and chemical composition. The removal rate of N and P was rapid during the first week of growth. At the end of the second week, more than 90% of the total -P and -N was removed. The mass of alga was high. The quality of the alga obtained in different media did not show much variations, except when the medium was limited in nutrients. Results indicated that Spirulina may be integrated into the effluent treatment system. Recycling waste materials not only minimizes the problem of water pollution but also revitalizes the inherently rich nutrients of waste. The biomass obtained from cultivation of Spirulina in these wastewater media may be used as a pigment-protein supplement in animal feed and as raw material for certain chemicals.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Phycology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 28:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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