skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Fiber composite materials technology development

Abstract

The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
6974734
Report Number(s):
UCRL-85106
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; FATIGUE; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; FLYWHEELS; EPOXIDES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; MATERIALS TESTING; DATA; INFORMATION; MATERIALS; MECHANICAL ENERGY STORAGE EQUIPMENT; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; TESTING; 250500* - Energy Storage- Flywheels

Citation Formats

Chiao, T.T. Fiber composite materials technology development. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Chiao, T.T. Fiber composite materials technology development. United States.
Chiao, T.T. Thu . "Fiber composite materials technology development". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6974734,
title = {Fiber composite materials technology development},
author = {Chiao, T.T.},
abstractNote = {The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Oct 23 00:00:00 EDT 1980},
month = {Thu Oct 23 00:00:00 EDT 1980}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • Uncertainties about the long-term ability of monolithic ceramics to survive in the IGCC or PFBC hot gas filter environment led DOE/METC to consider the merits of using continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCCs) as potential next-generation high temperature filter elements. This seems to be a logical strategy to pursue in light of the fact that properly-engineered CFCC materials have shown much-improved damage tolerance and thermal shock behavior as compared to existing monolithic ceramic materials. Textron`s Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development Program was intended to be a two year, two phase program which transitioned developmental materials R and D into prototypemore » filter element fabrication. The first phase was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fabricating CFCC hot gas filter elements which could meet the pressure drop specifications of less than ten inches of water (iwg) at a face velocity of ten feet per minute (fpm), while showing sufficient integrity to survive normal mechanical loads and adequate environmental resistance to steam/alkali corrosion conditions at a temperature of approximately 870 C (1600 F). The primary objective of the second phase of the program was to scale up fabrication methods developed in Phase 1 to produce full-scale CFCC candle filters for validation testing. Textron encountered significant process-related and technical difficulties in merely meeting the program permeability specifications, and much effort was expended in showing that this could indeed be achieved. Thus, by the time the Phase 1 program was completed, expenditure of program funds precluded continuing on with Phase 2, and Textron elected to terminate their program after Phase 1. This allowed Textron to be able to focus technical and commercialization efforts on their largely successful DOE CFCC Program.« less
  • Production processes, test methods, and properties of fiber reinforced aluminum alloys are described. Methods such as plasma spraying, hot pressing and continuous infiltration are applied to produce boron fiber reinforced metals. The embedding of discontinuous fibers, for instance SiC whiskers, was carried out by powder metallurgical or liquid infiltration methods. In order to clear up some principal questions adhesion and wetting investigations were made for the sessile drop method.
  • Data and results from the third year's work on Application of Sputter-Deposited Lamellar Composite Technology to the Development of High Temperature Turbine Blade Materials and Airfoil Fabrication are presented and discussed.
  • The overall objectives of the Fiber Composite Retaining Rings for Turbine Driven Generators Program were to develop composite design data, construction techniques and methods of attachment that would support the application of graphite epoxy composites for electrical generator retaining rings. The contractor's approach to the design of an optimum graphite epoxy composite retaining ring involved a combined finite element analysis and material testing effort. The initial phase of this program (Material Development) dealt exclusively with development of the conventional strength of materials parameters under loading conditions representative of intended service requirements as well as special considerations related to the developmentmore » of rational strength and fracture criteria for composites. Notched body, cracked body and combined mode loading considerations were addressed. The role of nondestructive testing in the characterizing of composite structure quality and overall structural integrity considerations was also included. Results from the vast number and variety of tests conducted in Phase I of the project combined to support the application of graphite epoxy composites for electrical generator retaining rings.« less
  • The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloysmore » and aluminum alloy castings.« less