skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Measuring metal sulfide complexes in oxic river waters with square wave voltammetry

Abstract

A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyzes, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific group: (1) Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni (bi)sulfides, (2) Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfides, and (3) Cu sulfides. All metal sulfide complexes were measured in low nanomolar concentrations in the oxic waters of four Connecticut rivers, using a thin mercury film rotating disk glassy carbon electrode (TMF-RDGCE). The short residence times associated with a RDE prevents certain strong metal sulfide complexes (Cu, Zn, and Pb) from dissociating at pH {gt} 7.0 during depositions, which allows for identification in certain pH zones. The concentrations of the specific metal sulfide complexes were linked to the extent of watershed development and proximity to source areas. At sampling sites impacted by treated sewage effluent, the concentrations of Cu and Zn sulfide complexes accounted for over 30% of the total metals passing through a 0.45-{micro}m filter. Ultrafiltration revealed that between 30% and 60% of these Cu and Zn sulfide complexes were {gt} 3,000 MW and probably associated with organic matter. A kinetic loss experiment showed that the Cumore » and Zn sulfide complexes had half-lives {gt}15 days, demonstrating the importance of these complexes as metal carrier in small- and medium-sized river systems.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
696776
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WATER POLLUTION; COBALT SULFIDES; IRON SULFIDES; MANGANESE SULFIDES; NICKEL SULFIDES; ZINC SULFIDES; LEAD SULFIDES; COPPER SULFIDES; RIVERS; MONITORING; MEASURING METHODS

Citation Formats

Rozan, T.F., Benoit, G., and Luther, G.W. III. Measuring metal sulfide complexes in oxic river waters with square wave voltammetry. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es981206r.
Rozan, T.F., Benoit, G., & Luther, G.W. III. Measuring metal sulfide complexes in oxic river waters with square wave voltammetry. United States. doi:10.1021/es981206r.
Rozan, T.F., Benoit, G., and Luther, G.W. III. Wed . "Measuring metal sulfide complexes in oxic river waters with square wave voltammetry". United States. doi:10.1021/es981206r.
@article{osti_696776,
title = {Measuring metal sulfide complexes in oxic river waters with square wave voltammetry},
author = {Rozan, T.F. and Benoit, G. and Luther, G.W. III},
abstractNote = {A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyzes, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific group: (1) Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni (bi)sulfides, (2) Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfides, and (3) Cu sulfides. All metal sulfide complexes were measured in low nanomolar concentrations in the oxic waters of four Connecticut rivers, using a thin mercury film rotating disk glassy carbon electrode (TMF-RDGCE). The short residence times associated with a RDE prevents certain strong metal sulfide complexes (Cu, Zn, and Pb) from dissociating at pH {gt} 7.0 during depositions, which allows for identification in certain pH zones. The concentrations of the specific metal sulfide complexes were linked to the extent of watershed development and proximity to source areas. At sampling sites impacted by treated sewage effluent, the concentrations of Cu and Zn sulfide complexes accounted for over 30% of the total metals passing through a 0.45-{micro}m filter. Ultrafiltration revealed that between 30% and 60% of these Cu and Zn sulfide complexes were {gt} 3,000 MW and probably associated with organic matter. A kinetic loss experiment showed that the Cu and Zn sulfide complexes had half-lives {gt}15 days, demonstrating the importance of these complexes as metal carrier in small- and medium-sized river systems.},
doi = {10.1021/es981206r},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 17,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}