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Title: Fate and transport of hexavalent chromium in undisturbed heterogeneous soil

Abstract

The disposal of toxic metals [e.g., Cr(VI)] generated by the Department of Energy during the cold war era has historically involved shallow land burial in unconfined pits and trenches. The objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of coupled hydrologic and geochemical processes on the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in undisturbed soil cores obtained from a fractured, acidic inceptisol that are commonly used in the disposal of waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The mobility of Cr(VI) was significantly retarded relative to a nonreactive Br{sup {minus}} tracer, and the mobility decreased with increased loading of the solid phase with natural organic matter (NOM). A significant portion of added Cr(VI) did not elute from the columns, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) resided on the soil mineral surfaces. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was dramatically more significant on soils with higher levels of surface-bound NOM. This indicated that NOM was serving as a suitable reductant during Cr(VI) transport even in the presence of potentially competing geochemical oxidation reactions involving Cr. The redox reaction was catalyzed by the presence of soil mineral surfaces, and the reduced product Cr(III) was immobilized asmore » a tightly bound moiety. The effectiveness of surface-bound NOM to reduce toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III) under acidic conditions has important implications regarding the design and implementation of in situ remedial strategies.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.
  2. Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Environmental Science
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
696767
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; CHROMIUM; SOIL CHEMISTRY; REMEDIAL ACTION; IN-SITU PROCESSING; HYDROLOGY

Citation Formats

Jardine, P.M., Mayes, M.A., Larsen, I.L., Brooks, S.C., Bailey, W.B., and Fendorf, S.E. Fate and transport of hexavalent chromium in undisturbed heterogeneous soil. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es981211v.
Jardine, P.M., Mayes, M.A., Larsen, I.L., Brooks, S.C., Bailey, W.B., & Fendorf, S.E. Fate and transport of hexavalent chromium in undisturbed heterogeneous soil. United States. doi:10.1021/es981211v.
Jardine, P.M., Mayes, M.A., Larsen, I.L., Brooks, S.C., Bailey, W.B., and Fendorf, S.E. Wed . "Fate and transport of hexavalent chromium in undisturbed heterogeneous soil". United States. doi:10.1021/es981211v.
@article{osti_696767,
title = {Fate and transport of hexavalent chromium in undisturbed heterogeneous soil},
author = {Jardine, P.M. and Mayes, M.A. and Larsen, I.L. and Brooks, S.C. and Bailey, W.B. and Fendorf, S.E.},
abstractNote = {The disposal of toxic metals [e.g., Cr(VI)] generated by the Department of Energy during the cold war era has historically involved shallow land burial in unconfined pits and trenches. The objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of coupled hydrologic and geochemical processes on the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in undisturbed soil cores obtained from a fractured, acidic inceptisol that are commonly used in the disposal of waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The mobility of Cr(VI) was significantly retarded relative to a nonreactive Br{sup {minus}} tracer, and the mobility decreased with increased loading of the solid phase with natural organic matter (NOM). A significant portion of added Cr(VI) did not elute from the columns, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) resided on the soil mineral surfaces. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was dramatically more significant on soils with higher levels of surface-bound NOM. This indicated that NOM was serving as a suitable reductant during Cr(VI) transport even in the presence of potentially competing geochemical oxidation reactions involving Cr. The redox reaction was catalyzed by the presence of soil mineral surfaces, and the reduced product Cr(III) was immobilized as a tightly bound moiety. The effectiveness of surface-bound NOM to reduce toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III) under acidic conditions has important implications regarding the design and implementation of in situ remedial strategies.},
doi = {10.1021/es981211v},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 17,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}