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Title: Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethylene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater

Abstract

Wetland vegetation may be useful in the remediation of shallow contaminated aquifers. Mesocosm experiments were conducted to describe the regulatory mechanisms affecting trichloroethene (TCE) removal rates from groundwater by flood-adapted wetland trees at a contaminated site. TCE flux through baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L) Rich] seedlings grown in glass-carbons decreased from day to night and from August to December. The diel fluctuation coincided with changes in leaf-level physiology, as the daytime flux was significantly correlated with net photosynthesis but not with respiration at night. A decrease in seeding water use from summer to winter explained the large seasonal difference in TCE flux. A simple model that simulates gas-phase diffusion through aerenchyma tested the importance of diffusion of TCE vapor from roots to the stem. The modeled diffusive flux was within 64% of the observed value during the winter but could only explain 8% of the summer flux. Seeding water use was a good estimator of flux during the summer. Hence, evapotranspiration (ET) in the summer may serve as a good predictor for the potential to TCE removal by baldcypress trees, while diffusive flux may better approximate potential contaminant loss in the winter.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
  2. Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
696764
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 17; Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; REMEDIAL ACTION; AQUIFERS; BIODEGRADATION; TREES; GROUND WATER; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SEASONAL VARIATIONS

Citation Formats

Nietch, C.T., Morris, J.T., and Vroblesky, D.A. Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethylene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es981183g.
Nietch, C.T., Morris, J.T., & Vroblesky, D.A. Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethylene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater. United States. doi:10.1021/es981183g.
Nietch, C.T., Morris, J.T., and Vroblesky, D.A. Wed . "Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethylene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater". United States. doi:10.1021/es981183g.
@article{osti_696764,
title = {Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethylene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater},
author = {Nietch, C.T. and Morris, J.T. and Vroblesky, D.A.},
abstractNote = {Wetland vegetation may be useful in the remediation of shallow contaminated aquifers. Mesocosm experiments were conducted to describe the regulatory mechanisms affecting trichloroethene (TCE) removal rates from groundwater by flood-adapted wetland trees at a contaminated site. TCE flux through baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L) Rich] seedlings grown in glass-carbons decreased from day to night and from August to December. The diel fluctuation coincided with changes in leaf-level physiology, as the daytime flux was significantly correlated with net photosynthesis but not with respiration at night. A decrease in seeding water use from summer to winter explained the large seasonal difference in TCE flux. A simple model that simulates gas-phase diffusion through aerenchyma tested the importance of diffusion of TCE vapor from roots to the stem. The modeled diffusive flux was within 64% of the observed value during the winter but could only explain 8% of the summer flux. Seeding water use was a good estimator of flux during the summer. Hence, evapotranspiration (ET) in the summer may serve as a good predictor for the potential to TCE removal by baldcypress trees, while diffusive flux may better approximate potential contaminant loss in the winter.},
doi = {10.1021/es981183g},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 17,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}