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Title: Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator

Abstract

The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) uses a [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid mixture as a working fluid. It operates at temperatures below 2 K where the [sup 4]He component of the working fluid is superfluid. The [sup 3]He component of the working fluid, to first approximation, behaves thermodynamically like an ideal gas in the inert background of superfluid [sup 4]He. Using pistons equipped with a superleak bypass, it is possible to expand and compress the [sup 3]He solute gas.'' The SSR is a Stirling machine equipped with these superleaked'' pistons to take advantage of the properties of the [sup 3]He solute to cool below 1 K. The proof of principle was shown by Kotsubo and Swift in 1990. There are three other techniques for cooling below 1 K: (1) the [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He dilution refrigerator which utilizes the endothermic heat of mixing of [sup 3]He into [sup 4]He to reach temperatures below 0.010 K; (2) the evaporation of [sup 3]He which can reach temperatures of 0.3 K; and, (3) adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt. There are several advantages of the SSR over each of the other techniques. The power consumption of a dilution refrigerator is typically on the order ofmore » kilowatts; whereas, the SSR consumes hundreds of watts. The SSR has the potential to cool below 0.3 K and out-perform the evaporative [sup 3]He refrigerator. Adiabatic demagnetization often requires magnetic shielding between the refrigerator and the object to be cooled; obviously, the SSR requires no such shielding. There is an interest in developing subkelvin cryocoolers for satellite-borne X-ray and infrared detectors. In space applications, the power consumption of an SSR can be reduced to tens of watts. This coupled with the SSR's insensitivity to a zero G environment makes it an attractive option to cool detectors in space.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6966348
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-92-3853; CONF-921130-1
ON: DE93003858
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7. international cryocooler conference, Santa Fe, NM (United States), 15-19 Nov 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; REFRIGERATORS; STIRLING CYCLE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CRYOGENICS; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; SUPERFLUIDITY; EVALUATION; THERMODYNAMIC CYCLES; 661210* - Cryogenics- (1992-)

Citation Formats

Brisson, J.G., and Swift, G.W. Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Brisson, J.G., & Swift, G.W. Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator. United States.
Brisson, J.G., and Swift, G.W. Wed . "Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator". United States.
@article{osti_6966348,
title = {Superfluid Stirling refrigerator with a counterflow regenerator},
author = {Brisson, J.G. and Swift, G.W.},
abstractNote = {The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) uses a [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid mixture as a working fluid. It operates at temperatures below 2 K where the [sup 4]He component of the working fluid is superfluid. The [sup 3]He component of the working fluid, to first approximation, behaves thermodynamically like an ideal gas in the inert background of superfluid [sup 4]He. Using pistons equipped with a superleak bypass, it is possible to expand and compress the [sup 3]He solute gas.'' The SSR is a Stirling machine equipped with these superleaked'' pistons to take advantage of the properties of the [sup 3]He solute to cool below 1 K. The proof of principle was shown by Kotsubo and Swift in 1990. There are three other techniques for cooling below 1 K: (1) the [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He dilution refrigerator which utilizes the endothermic heat of mixing of [sup 3]He into [sup 4]He to reach temperatures below 0.010 K; (2) the evaporation of [sup 3]He which can reach temperatures of 0.3 K; and, (3) adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt. There are several advantages of the SSR over each of the other techniques. The power consumption of a dilution refrigerator is typically on the order of kilowatts; whereas, the SSR consumes hundreds of watts. The SSR has the potential to cool below 0.3 K and out-perform the evaporative [sup 3]He refrigerator. Adiabatic demagnetization often requires magnetic shielding between the refrigerator and the object to be cooled; obviously, the SSR requires no such shielding. There is an interest in developing subkelvin cryocoolers for satellite-borne X-ray and infrared detectors. In space applications, the power consumption of an SSR can be reduced to tens of watts. This coupled with the SSR's insensitivity to a zero G environment makes it an attractive option to cool detectors in space.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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