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Title: Integrated gas-fired desiccant dehumidification vapor-compression cooling system for residential application. Phase 2. Final report, December 1987-December 1988

Abstract

Field tests of a residential liquid-desiccant dehumidifier are described. From analysis done in Phase I of this program, a gas-fired boiler for regenerating the desiccant was selected with a one-ton capacity dehumidifier. Three field-experiment units were built. One was installed at a test house in Gaithersburg, Maryland owned by GEOMET Technologies. The second was installed in Atlanta, Georgia, supported by the Atlanta Gas Light Company. The third unit was shipped to Lone Star Gas Company, Forth Worth, Texas, to be installed in 1989. Once startup problems were corrected, the units ran reliably, controlling indoor humidity accurately. The seasonal COP for the Gaithersburg installation was 0.58; for Atlanta the COP was 0.50. By extending the operating periods (typically 5 minutes in these tests), the COP should increase. A manufacturing cost study of the residential dehumidifier showed that a factory cost of $553.62/unit is achieved at 50,000 units/year volume.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6957064
Report Number(s):
PB-90-171232/XAB; TR--4477-142-89
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: See also PB--89-140842
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEHUMIDIFIERS; FIELD TESTS; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; DEHUMIDIFICATION; AIR CONDITIONING; COMPRESSORS; COOLING SYSTEMS; DESICCANTS; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; NATURAL GAS; PROGRESS REPORT; BUILDINGS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ECONOMICS; ENERGY SOURCES; ENERGY SYSTEMS; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; TESTING 320106* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Equipment-- (1987-); 291000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Conservation

Citation Formats

Bartz, D., Zografos, A., and Marsala, J.. Integrated gas-fired desiccant dehumidification vapor-compression cooling system for residential application. Phase 2. Final report, December 1987-December 1988. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Bartz, D., Zografos, A., & Marsala, J.. Integrated gas-fired desiccant dehumidification vapor-compression cooling system for residential application. Phase 2. Final report, December 1987-December 1988. United States.
Bartz, D., Zografos, A., and Marsala, J.. 1989. "Integrated gas-fired desiccant dehumidification vapor-compression cooling system for residential application. Phase 2. Final report, December 1987-December 1988". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6957064,
title = {Integrated gas-fired desiccant dehumidification vapor-compression cooling system for residential application. Phase 2. Final report, December 1987-December 1988},
author = {Bartz, D. and Zografos, A. and Marsala, J.},
abstractNote = {Field tests of a residential liquid-desiccant dehumidifier are described. From analysis done in Phase I of this program, a gas-fired boiler for regenerating the desiccant was selected with a one-ton capacity dehumidifier. Three field-experiment units were built. One was installed at a test house in Gaithersburg, Maryland owned by GEOMET Technologies. The second was installed in Atlanta, Georgia, supported by the Atlanta Gas Light Company. The third unit was shipped to Lone Star Gas Company, Forth Worth, Texas, to be installed in 1989. Once startup problems were corrected, the units ran reliably, controlling indoor humidity accurately. The seasonal COP for the Gaithersburg installation was 0.58; for Atlanta the COP was 0.50. By extending the operating periods (typically 5 minutes in these tests), the COP should increase. A manufacturing cost study of the residential dehumidifier showed that a factory cost of $553.62/unit is achieved at 50,000 units/year volume.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month =
}

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  • The development of an air conditioner that uses a liquid-desiccant dehumidifier is described. Three air-conditioning systems that integrate the operation of a conventional vapor-compression system with a liquid-desiccant dehumidifier were first simulated in seasonal performance studies. These studies showed that there was little benefit from attempting to recover reject heat from the vapor-compression system for regenerating the liquid desiccant. The preferred version of the liquid-desiccant dehumidifier was one that used a simple gas-fired boiler for regenerating the desiccant. When added to a conventional vapor-compression air conditioner, this liquid-desiccant system could maintain comfortable humidity levels in the living space for almostmore » the entire cooling season at a modest premium in operating costs.« less
  • A residential liquid desiccant-boosted evaporative cooling system was developed. The major components included a cross-flow heat exchanger, interchange heat exchanger, and brine boiler. The unit measures approximately 64 inch (L) x 46 inch (W) x 49 inch (H). Economic studies using DOE-2 project a large market potential for the system, with Fresno, California, and El Paso, Texas, the top two market areas. Considerable engineering effort must still be carried out before the system can be commercialized. Some of the outstanding issues include the development of a method for mass-producing a low-cost leaktight cross-flow heat exchanger, tests for corrosion in themore » boiler, and the development of system controls.« less
  • The Topical Report covers the design, construction, and overall performance test evaluations of two preproduction prototype desiccant cooling systems (DCS Units 1 and 2). The work is the second phase of a program to develop an efficient gas-fired cooling system based upon the use of desiccant dehumidification principles. Measured and computer predicted values are evaluated to characterize overall system and individual performances. Variations between measured and predicted performances are explained. Suggestions are given based upon these analyses.
  • The research reported here is an experimental study to determine the performance and economics of an alternative to presently available heat-driven cooling cycles. This alternative, called desiccant cooling, uses a drying agent (desiccant) to remove almost all of the moisture from outside air. In this work, the absorber, which is the particular part of the desiccant system that brings the air in contact with the desiccant while simultaneously providing cooling, has been tested. The results are compared with previously done computer models of the absorber behavior. The projected economics of the system are also examined, and the system is foundmore » to show promise against projected deregulated conventional energy costs.« less
  • Domain analysis and the development of the rapid prototype system have revealed that the implementation of an expert system is possible if some preliminary work is done to standardize the equipment and establish clear guidelines for load shedding and other decisions. This effort should be carried out (even if the expert system is not implemented) to ensure reliable, efficient power generation and utilization and to reduce the likelihood of costly mistakes. The contractor is convinced that the technology is valuable to the Army in terms of improved inventory handling, optimized power usage, and operator training, all leading to more-effective missionmore » completion.« less