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Title: Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves

Abstract

In this study, the deposition of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} was measured to three tree species, elm, oak and pine. Earlier work has shown that these three species cover of physical types (smooth oak leaves, rough elm leaves, and needles) and chemical types (acid and alkaline leaves) The total deposition is compared to the deposition measured through the stomata. After deposition, removal by revolatilization or extraction was determined. The data is used to estimate dry deposition fluxes of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} to forests that can then be combined with wet fluxes to determine total atmospheric inputs. Based on these results, a preliminary estimate is made of the possible detrimental effects to forests from atomspheric inputs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (General Motors Research Lab., Warren, MI (US))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6946887
Report Number(s):
CONF-880679--
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 81. annual meeting of Air Pollution Control Association, Dallas, TX (USA), 19-24 Jun 1988; Other Information: 88-119.1; Related Information: Volume 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FORESTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; NITRIC ACID; DEPOSITION; SULFUR DIOXIDE; CHEMICAL EFFLUENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; LEAVES; OAKS; PINES; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; CHALCOGENIDES; CONIFERS; ECOSYSTEMS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INORGANIC ACIDS; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MAGNOLIOPSIDA; MASS TRANSFER; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PINOPHYTA; PLANTS; POLLUTION; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; TREES 540120* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 553000 -- Agriculture & Food Technology; 540220 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Dash, J.M. Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Dash, J.M. Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves. United States.
Dash, J.M. 1988. "Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6946887,
title = {Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves},
author = {Dash, J.M.},
abstractNote = {In this study, the deposition of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} was measured to three tree species, elm, oak and pine. Earlier work has shown that these three species cover of physical types (smooth oak leaves, rough elm leaves, and needles) and chemical types (acid and alkaline leaves) The total deposition is compared to the deposition measured through the stomata. After deposition, removal by revolatilization or extraction was determined. The data is used to estimate dry deposition fluxes of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} to forests that can then be combined with wet fluxes to determine total atmospheric inputs. Based on these results, a preliminary estimate is made of the possible detrimental effects to forests from atomspheric inputs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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