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Title: Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio: Phase 3. Evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends (Chapter C)

Abstract

During the past several years, a growing number of questions have been raised by members of Congress and others about current water-quality conditions in the Nation, trends in water quality, and the major factors that affect water-quality conditions and trends. One area of particular interest and concern has been the suitability of existing water-quality data for addressing these types of questions at regional and national scales. In response to these questions and concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to determine (1) the characteristics of current water-quality data-collection activities of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and universities and (2) how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve the ability to address questions.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States). Water Resources Div.
OSTI Identifier:
6939904
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6939904
Report Number(s):
PB-93-102036/XAB; USGS/WATER-SUPPLY PAPER--2295-C
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Also available from Supt. of Docs. Library of Congress catalog card no. 85-600347
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COLORADO; WATER QUALITY; OHIO; DATA ACQUISITION; HYDROLOGY; MAPS; RECOMMENDATIONS; REGIONAL ANALYSIS; SAMPLING; STATE GOVERNMENT; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; FEDERAL REGION VIII; NORTH AMERICA; USA 540320* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540220 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Norris, J.M., Hren, J., Myers, D.N., Chaney, T.H., and Oblinger Childress, C.J.. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio: Phase 3. Evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends (Chapter C). United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Norris, J.M., Hren, J., Myers, D.N., Chaney, T.H., & Oblinger Childress, C.J.. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio: Phase 3. Evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends (Chapter C). United States.
Norris, J.M., Hren, J., Myers, D.N., Chaney, T.H., and Oblinger Childress, C.J.. Wed . "Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio: Phase 3. Evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends (Chapter C)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6939904,
title = {Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio: Phase 3. Evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends (Chapter C)},
author = {Norris, J.M. and Hren, J. and Myers, D.N. and Chaney, T.H. and Oblinger Childress, C.J.},
abstractNote = {During the past several years, a growing number of questions have been raised by members of Congress and others about current water-quality conditions in the Nation, trends in water quality, and the major factors that affect water-quality conditions and trends. One area of particular interest and concern has been the suitability of existing water-quality data for addressing these types of questions at regional and national scales. In response to these questions and concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to determine (1) the characteristics of current water-quality data-collection activities of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and universities and (2) how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve the ability to address questions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

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