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Title: Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

Abstract

Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6938275
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Power Engineering Review; (USA); Journal Volume: 5:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; DEUTERIUM IONS; HEAVY ION FUSION REACTIONS; TRITIUM; COLD PLASMA; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; PLASMA CONFINEMENT; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CHARGED PARTICLES; CONFINEMENT; DATA; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; INFORMATION; IONS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; NUCLEI; NUMERICAL DATA; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; PLASMA; RADIOISOTOPES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 700205* - Fusion Power Plant Technology- Fuel, Heating, & Injection Systems; 700200 - Fusion Energy- Fusion Power Plant Technology

Citation Formats

Rabinowitz, M. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Rabinowitz, M. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality. United States.
Rabinowitz, M. Mon . "Cold fusion; Myth versus reality". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6938275,
title = {Cold fusion; Myth versus reality},
author = {Rabinowitz, M.},
abstractNote = {Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.},
doi = {},
journal = {IEEE Power Engineering Review; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 5:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1990},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1990}
}
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