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Title: Clinton climate plan sees nuclear power kept as it is

Abstract

President Bill Clinton released his administration's Climate Change Action Plan on October 19, with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the United States in the year 2000 not only to 1990 levels, as urged at the Earth Summit in Brazil in 1992, but slightly below that point. The plan, however, relies heavily on voluntary action by energy producers and consumers to achieve the reduction of 109 million metric tons of carbon equivalent below the emission level currently projected for 2000. It also includes sparse references to nuclear power, and goes no further than an endorsement of the continued operation of the current generation of power reactors.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6934220
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear News (La Grange Park, Illinois); (United States); Journal Volume: 36:15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; US DOE; US NRC; MANAGEMENT; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; POWER; US ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT 290600* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Nuclear Energy; 293000 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation

Citation Formats

Not Available. Clinton climate plan sees nuclear power kept as it is. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Not Available. Clinton climate plan sees nuclear power kept as it is. United States.
Not Available. 1993. "Clinton climate plan sees nuclear power kept as it is". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6934220,
title = {Clinton climate plan sees nuclear power kept as it is},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {President Bill Clinton released his administration's Climate Change Action Plan on October 19, with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the United States in the year 2000 not only to 1990 levels, as urged at the Earth Summit in Brazil in 1992, but slightly below that point. The plan, however, relies heavily on voluntary action by energy producers and consumers to achieve the reduction of 109 million metric tons of carbon equivalent below the emission level currently projected for 2000. It also includes sparse references to nuclear power, and goes no further than an endorsement of the continued operation of the current generation of power reactors.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nuclear News (La Grange Park, Illinois); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 36:15,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}
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