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Title: The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah

Abstract

Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allowsmore » circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA))
  2. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/CE
OSTI Identifier:
6931402
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6931402; Legacy ID: DE90010574
Report Number(s):
DOE/ID/12756-1
ON: DE90010574
DOE Contract Number:
FG07-88ID12756
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; HYDROLOGY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; FLUID FLOW; GEOLOGIC FAULTS; GEOLOGY; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; GROUND WATER; HEAT TRANSFER; HOT SPRINGS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PROGRESS REPORT; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; DOCUMENT TYPES; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; ENERGY TRANSFER; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SURVEYS; THERMAL SPRINGS; WATER; WATER SPRINGS Geothermal Legacy 150200* -- Geology & Hydrology of Geothermal Systems

Citation Formats

Blackett, R.E., Shubat, M.A., Bishop, C.E., Chapman, D.S., Forster, C.B., and Schlinger, C.M. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.2172/6931402.
Blackett, R.E., Shubat, M.A., Bishop, C.E., Chapman, D.S., Forster, C.B., & Schlinger, C.M. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah. United States. doi:10.2172/6931402.
Blackett, R.E., Shubat, M.A., Bishop, C.E., Chapman, D.S., Forster, C.B., and Schlinger, C.M. Thu . "The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah". United States. doi:10.2172/6931402. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6931402.
@article{osti_6931402,
title = {The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah},
author = {Blackett, R.E. and Shubat, M.A. and Bishop, C.E. and Chapman, D.S. and Forster, C.B. and Schlinger, C.M.},
abstractNote = {Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.},
doi = {10.2172/6931402},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1990},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1990}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This appendix contains raw data used in the fault slip analysis. Data was collected from four sites, sites A through D. Minor fault slip measurements are listed for each site, and each row of data is one measurement. The index number is an arbitrary sequential number. Strike is the strike of the fault plane, measured in the northern hemisphere. Dip is the dip of the fault plane, which has two letters attached to the end showing the quadrant of the dip direction. Rake is the rake of the slickenside in the plane of the fault, which has two letters attachedmore » to the end showing the quadrant of the plunge direction of the rake. Sense is the sense of slip of the fault: N = normal (rake > 45{degree}), R = reverse (rake > 45{degree}), D = dextral (rake < 45{degree}), S = sinistral (rake < 45{degree}). 37 figs., 19 tabs.« less
  • The Warm Spring Fault geothermal system is located in northern Salt Lake County at the northern limit of the Salt Lake City corporate boundary. The system is immediately west of the Wasatch Mountains at the easternmost edge of the Basin and Range physiographic province within an active seismic zone referred to as the intermountain seismic belt. The thermal springs of the system are located at the western edge of the Salt Lake salient that is intermediate in elevation between the Wasatch Range to the east and the deep valley graben to the west. Displacement from the salient into the grabenmore » occurs along two faults. The Warm Springs Fault has a minimum displacement of approximately 180 m (600 ft), and the down thrown block is buried beneath approximately 120 m (400 ft) of valley fill. A second fault referred to as the Hobo Springs Fault lies to the west and has a total displacement of approximately 1220 m (4000 ft). Major thermal springs appear to be located near the intersections of these major normal faults with each other and with relatively minor pre-Basin and Range structures of the salient. Recharge to the system is believed to be from an undefined source area in the Wasatch Range, and the water is heated in the normal geothermal gradient by circulation to depths of 1.5 to 2 km. Data collected at the Warm Springs Fault geothermal system under the DOE/DGE state coupled program is presented for use by individuals interested in the system.« less
  • Twenty-five new regional heat flow measurements are presented for the Escalante Desert region within the Great Basin of the western US. Heat flow excluding geothermal areas ranges from 42 to 350 mW m/sup -2/ but much of the variability may be caused by deeply circulating groundwater redistributing the regional flux. A subset of 10 sites drilled specifically to characterize the heat flow of the region yielded a mean of 100 mW m/sup -2/ with a standard deviation of 22 mW m/sup -2/. An analysis of thermal conductivities of solid cylindrical discs and rock chips of rhyolite to andesite tuffs emphasizedmore » the importance of porosity corrections to thermal conductivity measurements. A blind geothermal system southwest of Newcastle, Utah, situated within the Escalante Desert has also been studied. Heat flow results from 11 local drillholes yield values between 163 and 3065 mW m/sup -2/. The 500 mW m/sup -2/ contour encloses an area of 9.4 km/sup 2/. By integrating the anomalous flux above background over the thermal anomaly, a thermal power loss of 12.8 mW and corresponding subsurface mass discharge of 32 kg s/sup -1/ are calculated for this geothermal system.« less
  • To evaluate the geothermal energy potential of the hot springs system near Midway, Wasatch Co., Utah, consideration was given to heat flow, water chemistry, and structural controls. Abnormal heat flow was indicated qualitatively by snow-melt patterns and quantitatively by heat-flow measurements that were obtained from two of four temperature-gradient wells drilled in the area. These measurements indicated that the area north of the town of Midway is characterized by heat flow equal to 321.75 MW/m/sup 2/, which is over four times the value generally considered as normal heat flow. Chemical analyses of water from six selected thermal springs and wellsmore » were used in conjunction with the silica and Na-K-Ca geothermometers to estimate the reservoir temperature of the thermal system. Because the calculated temperature was more than 25/sup 0/C above the maximum observed temperature, a mixing model calculation was used to project an upper limit for the reservoir temperature. Based on these calculations, the system has a reservoir temperature ranging from 46 to 125/sup 0/C. Structural information obtained from published geologic maps of the area and from an unpublished gravity survey, enabled two models to be developed for the system. The first model, based on geologic relationships in the mountains to the north and west of Midway, assumes that the heat for the thermal system comes from a relatively young intrusive or related hydrothermal convection system in the vicinity of the Mayflower mine. Meteoric waters would be heated as they approach the heat source and then move laterally to the south through faults and fractures in the rocks. These thermal waters then rise to the surface through fractures in the crest of an anticline underneath the Midway area. The second model, based on the gravity survey, assumes an igneous intrusion directly beneath Midway as the heat source.« less
  • The Crystal Hot Springs geothermal system is located in southern Salt Lake County, Utah 22.5 km (14 miles) south of Salt Lake City near the town of Draper. The system is immediately west of the Wasatch Mountains at the easternmost edge of the Basin and Range physiographic province within an active seismic zone referred to as the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The springs are located north of an east-west trending horst known as the Traverse Range. The range is intermediate in elevation between the Wasatch Range to the east and the valley grabens to the north and south. A series ofmore » northeast striking normal faults with a combined displacement of at least 90/sup 0/m (3000 ft) separate the horst from the Jordan Valley graben to the north. The spring system is located between two closely spaced range-front faults where the faults are intersected by a north-northeast striking fault. The fractured Paleozoic quartzite bedrock 25 m (80 ft) beneath the surface leaks thermal water into the overlying unconsolidated material and the springs issue along zones of weaknesses in the relatively impermeable confining zone that parallel the bedrock faults. Meteoric water from the Wasatch Range is warmed in the normal geothermal gradient of the province (approximately 32/sup 0/C/km) as the water circulates to a minimum depth of approximately 2.5 km (1.55 miles) via an undetermined path through aquifers and faults. Data collected at the Crystal Hot Springs system under the DOE state coupled program are presented for use by individuals interested in the system.« less