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Title: Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993

Abstract

This volume of the report Chernobyl Doses presents details of a new, quantitative method for remotely sensing ionizing radiation dose to vegetation. Analysis of Landsat imagery of the area within a few kilometers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor station provides maps of radiation dose to pine forest canopy resulting from the accident of April 26, 1986. Detection of the first date of significant, persistent deviation from normal of the spectral reflectance signature of pine foliage produces contours of radiation dose in the 20 to 80 Gy range extending up to 4 km from the site of the reactor explosion. The effective duration of exposure for the pine foliage is about 3 weeks. For this exposure time, the LD50 of Pinus sylvestris (Scotch pine) is about 23 Gy. The practical lower dose limit for the remote detection of radiation dose to pine foliage with the Landsat Thematic Mapper is about 5 Gy or 1/4 of the LD50.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific-Sierra Research Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6917571
Report Number(s):
AD-A-284746/5/XAB
CNN: DNA001-87-C-0104
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Original contains color plates; All DTIC/NTIS reproductions will be in black and white. See also Volume 2, AD-A259 085
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CANOPIES; REMOTE SENSING; FALLOUT; DETECTION; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; LANDSAT SATELLITES; PROGRESS REPORT; DOCUMENT TYPES; SATELLITES 540130* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

McClennan, G.E., Anno, G.H., and Whicker, F.W. Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
McClennan, G.E., Anno, G.H., & Whicker, F.W. Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993. United States.
McClennan, G.E., Anno, G.H., and Whicker, F.W. 1994. "Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6917571,
title = {Chernobyl doses. Volume 1. Analysis of forest canopy radiation response from multispectral imagery and the relationship to doses. Technical report, 29 July 1987-30 September 1993},
author = {McClennan, G.E. and Anno, G.H. and Whicker, F.W.},
abstractNote = {This volume of the report Chernobyl Doses presents details of a new, quantitative method for remotely sensing ionizing radiation dose to vegetation. Analysis of Landsat imagery of the area within a few kilometers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor station provides maps of radiation dose to pine forest canopy resulting from the accident of April 26, 1986. Detection of the first date of significant, persistent deviation from normal of the spectral reflectance signature of pine foliage produces contours of radiation dose in the 20 to 80 Gy range extending up to 4 km from the site of the reactor explosion. The effective duration of exposure for the pine foliage is about 3 weeks. For this exposure time, the LD50 of Pinus sylvestris (Scotch pine) is about 23 Gy. The practical lower dose limit for the remote detection of radiation dose to pine foliage with the Landsat Thematic Mapper is about 5 Gy or 1/4 of the LD50.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 9
}

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