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Title: Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids

Abstract

Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery techniques have long been used as means of inferring the underlying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids. This approach requires a considerable amount of subjective interpretation. In spite of this feature, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. Weak shocks are defined to be those with peak amplitudes (typically 10--20 GPa for most solids) that do not overdrive the elastic precursor. The essential elements of a typical shock-compression/release cycle involve, in order, (a) the elastic precursor, (b) plastic loading wave, (c) pulse duration, (d) release wave, and (e) post-mortem examination. These topics are examined in turn, with some emphasis given to elements (b) and (d). If the plastic loading wave is traveling without change of shape, it is possible to convert the particle-velocity/time records to a shear-stress/plastic-strain-rate path. Shock data in this form can be compared directly with low-to-intermediate strain-rate tests. Results for copper and tantalum show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from the deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. An important result of release-wave studies is thatmore » the leading observable release disturbance in FCC metals may not be propagating with the ideal, longitudinal elastic-wave speed, but at a lower velocity dependent on the elastic bulk and shear moduli and the product of the dislocation density times the pinning separation squared for dislocation segments in the region behind the shock and ahead of the release wave. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6908331
Report Number(s):
CONF-921145-
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X; CODEN: APCPCS
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 309:1; Conference: Production and neutralization of negative ions and beams, Upton, NY (United States), 9-13 Nov 1992; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SOLIDS; SHOCK WAVES; COMPRESSION; DEFORMATION; DISLOCATIONS; IMPACT SHOCK; PLASTICITY; STRAIN RATE; TIME DEPENDENCE; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; LINE DEFECTS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; 665000* - Physics of Condensed Matter- (1992-); 360103 - Metals & Alloys- Mechanical Properties

Citation Formats

Johnson, J N. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Johnson, J N. Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids. United States.
Johnson, J N. Sun . "Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids". United States.
@article{osti_6908331,
title = {Micromechanical strength effects in shock compression of solids},
author = {Johnson, J N},
abstractNote = {Time-resolved shock-wave measurements and post-shock recovery techniques have long been used as means of inferring the underlying micromechanics controlling high-rate deformation of solids. This approach requires a considerable amount of subjective interpretation. In spite of this feature, progress has been made in experimentation and theoretical interpretation of the shock-compression/release cycle and some of the results are reviewed here for weak shocks. Weak shocks are defined to be those with peak amplitudes (typically 10--20 GPa for most solids) that do not overdrive the elastic precursor. The essential elements of a typical shock-compression/release cycle involve, in order, (a) the elastic precursor, (b) plastic loading wave, (c) pulse duration, (d) release wave, and (e) post-mortem examination. These topics are examined in turn, with some emphasis given to elements (b) and (d). If the plastic loading wave is traveling without change of shape, it is possible to convert the particle-velocity/time records to a shear-stress/plastic-strain-rate path. Shock data in this form can be compared directly with low-to-intermediate strain-rate tests. Results for copper and tantalum show how shock data can be used to determine the transition from the deformation mechanism of thermal activation to that of dislocation drag. An important result of release-wave studies is that the leading observable release disturbance in FCC metals may not be propagating with the ideal, longitudinal elastic-wave speed, but at a lower velocity dependent on the elastic bulk and shear moduli and the product of the dislocation density times the pinning separation squared for dislocation segments in the region behind the shock and ahead of the release wave. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6908331}, journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings (American Institute of Physics); (United States)},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = ,
volume = 309:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {7}
}

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