skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The mechanical properties of drawn dual phase steel wire

Abstract

Dual-phase steels are a class of composite high strength, low alloy steels. The outstanding properties of ferrite/martensite dual-phase steels include its very high work-hardening rates and resistance to fatigue failure. The high work-hardening rates make dual-phase steels ideal for large strain cold forming applications, since high strengths may be achieved with less deformation. Dual-phase steels have been shown to be especially suited to wire drawing. In this study, Fe/xC/2Si alloys were heat treated to obtain different ferrite/martensite morphologies and relative volume fractions, then the work-hardening rates at true plastic strain {var epsilon} = 0.006 were determined. Wires were then drawn from 4.2 to 1.4 mm in diameter, which corresponded to a strain of {var epsilon} = 2.2, and tested in tension and fatigue. The early work-hardening rate increased with increased volume fraction of martensite, increased strength of martensite, and decreased ferrite/martensite interface coherency. The wire drawing limit was raised by discouraging void formation at ferrite/martensite interfaces and shear cracking through martensite particles. The lowest void density was obtained in a structure of fibrous martensite with coherent ferrite/martensite interfaces (i.e. produced by intermediate quenching). The fatigue limit of drawn dual-phase wires was {approximately}600 MPa, or 25--30% of the ultimate tensile strength,more » which appears to be higher than that of similar pearlitic steel wire. There was no superior microstructure for fatigue resistance in wires, as any morphology differences which exist in the initial structure are indistinguishable after heavy deformation.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
6902128
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6902128; Legacy ID: DE90013870
Report Number(s):
LBL-29060
ON: DE90013870
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (M.S.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; STEELS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; WIRES; DRAWING; FATIGUE; FERRITE; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; HEAT TREATMENTS; MARTENSITE; MICROSCOPY; MICROSTRUCTURE; TENSILE PROPERTIES; ALLOYS; CARBON ADDITIONS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; FABRICATION; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; MATERIALS WORKING 360103* -- Metals & Alloys-- Mechanical Properties; 360102 -- Metals & Alloys-- Structure & Phase Studies; 360101 -- Metals & Alloys-- Preparation & Fabrication

Citation Formats

Miyasato, S.M. The mechanical properties of drawn dual phase steel wire. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Miyasato, S.M. The mechanical properties of drawn dual phase steel wire. United States.
Miyasato, S.M. Tue . "The mechanical properties of drawn dual phase steel wire". United States.
@article{osti_6902128,
title = {The mechanical properties of drawn dual phase steel wire},
author = {Miyasato, S.M.},
abstractNote = {Dual-phase steels are a class of composite high strength, low alloy steels. The outstanding properties of ferrite/martensite dual-phase steels include its very high work-hardening rates and resistance to fatigue failure. The high work-hardening rates make dual-phase steels ideal for large strain cold forming applications, since high strengths may be achieved with less deformation. Dual-phase steels have been shown to be especially suited to wire drawing. In this study, Fe/xC/2Si alloys were heat treated to obtain different ferrite/martensite morphologies and relative volume fractions, then the work-hardening rates at true plastic strain {var epsilon} = 0.006 were determined. Wires were then drawn from 4.2 to 1.4 mm in diameter, which corresponded to a strain of {var epsilon} = 2.2, and tested in tension and fatigue. The early work-hardening rate increased with increased volume fraction of martensite, increased strength of martensite, and decreased ferrite/martensite interface coherency. The wire drawing limit was raised by discouraging void formation at ferrite/martensite interfaces and shear cracking through martensite particles. The lowest void density was obtained in a structure of fibrous martensite with coherent ferrite/martensite interfaces (i.e. produced by intermediate quenching). The fatigue limit of drawn dual-phase wires was {approximately}600 MPa, or 25--30% of the ultimate tensile strength, which appears to be higher than that of similar pearlitic steel wire. There was no superior microstructure for fatigue resistance in wires, as any morphology differences which exist in the initial structure are indistinguishable after heavy deformation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {12}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share: