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Title: Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments

Abstract

Microwave systems provide quick and easy determination of solids content of samples in high-level radioactive cells. In addition, dissolution of samples is much faster when employing microwave techniques. These are great advantages because work in cells,using master-slave manipulators through leaded glass walls, is normally slower by an order of magnitude than direct contact methods. This paper describes the modifiction of a moisture/solids analyzer microwave system and a drying/digestion microwave system for remote operation in radiation environments. The moisture/solids analyzer has operated satisfactorily for over a year in a gamma radiation field of 1000 roentgens per hour and the drying/digestion system is ready for installation in a cell.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.; Floyd Associates, Clover, SC (USA); CEM Corp., Matthews, NC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6901085
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6901085; Legacy ID: DE87005829
Report Number(s):
DP-MS-86-94-Rev.1; CONF-861009-1-Rev.1
ON: DE87005829
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-76SR00001
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Silver Jubilee Eastern Analytical symposium, New York, NY, USA, 20 Oct 1986; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; MICROWAVE DRYERS; DISSOLUTION; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; MOISTURE; RADIOACTIVITY; SOLIDS; DRYERS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; MATERIALS; MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; WASTES 052001* -- Nuclear Fuels-- Waste Processing

Citation Formats

Sturcken, E.F., Floyd, T.S., and Manchester, D.P. Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Sturcken, E.F., Floyd, T.S., & Manchester, D.P. Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments. United States.
Sturcken, E.F., Floyd, T.S., and Manchester, D.P. Wed . "Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6901085,
title = {Remote operation of microwave systems for solids content analysis and chemical dissolution in highly radioactive environments},
author = {Sturcken, E.F. and Floyd, T.S. and Manchester, D.P.},
abstractNote = {Microwave systems provide quick and easy determination of solids content of samples in high-level radioactive cells. In addition, dissolution of samples is much faster when employing microwave techniques. These are great advantages because work in cells,using master-slave manipulators through leaded glass walls, is normally slower by an order of magnitude than direct contact methods. This paper describes the modifiction of a moisture/solids analyzer microwave system and a drying/digestion microwave system for remote operation in radiation environments. The moisture/solids analyzer has operated satisfactorily for over a year in a gamma radiation field of 1000 roentgens per hour and the drying/digestion system is ready for installation in a cell.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986},
month = {Wed Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986}
}

Conference:
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