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Title: Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary

Abstract

Restoration of wetland habitats in highly urbanized areas is generally constrained by scarcity of opportunity, adverse impacts of surrounding land use, and cost. Although areal wetland losses approach 98% in Seattle's Duwamish River estuary, the system continues to support important salmonid runs, as well as a variety of bird and mammal species. Estuarine-dependent organisms are likely limited by quality and quantity of intertidal habitat in the system. Because the long-range, estuary-wide benefit of site-specific mitigation and restoration projects is limited, it is imperative to develop estuary-wide restoration plans. Towards this end, an inventory and analysis of potential intertidal habitat restoration sites has been completed for the Duwamish River estuary. Twenty-four sites, ranging in size from 0.8 to 25 acres were identified and comparative functional potential assessed. The majority of these sites (18) occur in the upper estuary. Two sites are located in Elliott Bay, and four are located near the historic mouth of the river in the vicinity of Harbor Island. Spatial data have been developed in geographic information system (GIS) format. Other site-specific data relative to habitat restoration has also been assembled.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA (United States). Environmental Evaluations Branch
OSTI Identifier:
6895104
Report Number(s):
PB-93-122190/XAB; EPA--910/9-91/050
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ESTUARIES; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; COASTAL REGIONS; COST; FISHES; HABITAT; LAND USE; LOSSES; MITIGATION; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; URBAN AREAS; WETLANDS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; DISTRIBUTION; ECOSYSTEMS; SURFACE WATERS; VERTEBRATES 540310* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Tanner, C.D. Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Tanner, C.D. Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary. United States.
Tanner, C.D. 1991. "Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6895104,
title = {Potential intertidal habitat restoration sites in the Duwamish River estuary},
author = {Tanner, C.D.},
abstractNote = {Restoration of wetland habitats in highly urbanized areas is generally constrained by scarcity of opportunity, adverse impacts of surrounding land use, and cost. Although areal wetland losses approach 98% in Seattle's Duwamish River estuary, the system continues to support important salmonid runs, as well as a variety of bird and mammal species. Estuarine-dependent organisms are likely limited by quality and quantity of intertidal habitat in the system. Because the long-range, estuary-wide benefit of site-specific mitigation and restoration projects is limited, it is imperative to develop estuary-wide restoration plans. Towards this end, an inventory and analysis of potential intertidal habitat restoration sites has been completed for the Duwamish River estuary. Twenty-four sites, ranging in size from 0.8 to 25 acres were identified and comparative functional potential assessed. The majority of these sites (18) occur in the upper estuary. Two sites are located in Elliott Bay, and four are located near the historic mouth of the river in the vicinity of Harbor Island. Spatial data have been developed in geographic information system (GIS) format. Other site-specific data relative to habitat restoration has also been assembled.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}

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