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Title: Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities

Abstract

At least five distinct sequence subtypes of HIV-I can be identified from the major centers of the AMS pandemic. While it is too early to tell whether these subtypes are serologically or phenotypically similar or distinct in terms of properties such as pathogenicity and transmissibility, we can begin to investigate their potential for phenotypic divergence at the protein sequence level. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV DNA sequences is being widely used to examine lineages of different viral strains as they evolve and spread throughout the globe. We have identified five distinct HIV-1 subtypes (designated A-E), or clades, based on phylogenetic clustering patterns generated from genetic information from both the gag and envelope (env) genes from a spectrum of international isolates. Our initial observations concerning both HIV-1 and HIV-2 sequences indicate that conserved patterns in protein chemistry may indeed exist across distant lineages. Such patterns in V3 loop amino acid chemistry may be indicative of stable lineages or convergence within this highly variable, though functionally and immunologically critical, region. We think that there may be parallels between the apparently stable HIV-2 V3 lineage and the previously mentioned HIV-1 V3 loops which are very similar at the protein level despite being distant bymore » cladistic analysis, and which do not possess the distinctive positively charged residues. Highly conserved V3 loop protein sequences are also encountered in SIVAGMs and CIVs (chimpanzee viral strains), which do not appear to be pathogenic in their wild-caught natural hosts.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOHHS; Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6893858
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-92-4119; CONF-9211162-1
ON: DE93005441
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7. cent gardes colloquium, Paris (France), Nov 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AIDS VIRUS; GENETIC VARIABILITY; ANTIGENS; AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; DNA SEQUENCING; PROTEINS; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; MICROORGANISMS; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PARASITES; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; VIRUSES; 550700* - Microbiology; 550900 - Pathology; 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Korber, B, and Myers, G. Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Korber, B, & Myers, G. Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities. United States.
Korber, B, and Myers, G. Wed . "Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities". United States.
@article{osti_6893858,
title = {Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities},
author = {Korber, B and Myers, G},
abstractNote = {At least five distinct sequence subtypes of HIV-I can be identified from the major centers of the AMS pandemic. While it is too early to tell whether these subtypes are serologically or phenotypically similar or distinct in terms of properties such as pathogenicity and transmissibility, we can begin to investigate their potential for phenotypic divergence at the protein sequence level. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV DNA sequences is being widely used to examine lineages of different viral strains as they evolve and spread throughout the globe. We have identified five distinct HIV-1 subtypes (designated A-E), or clades, based on phylogenetic clustering patterns generated from genetic information from both the gag and envelope (env) genes from a spectrum of international isolates. Our initial observations concerning both HIV-1 and HIV-2 sequences indicate that conserved patterns in protein chemistry may indeed exist across distant lineages. Such patterns in V3 loop amino acid chemistry may be indicative of stable lineages or convergence within this highly variable, though functionally and immunologically critical, region. We think that there may be parallels between the apparently stable HIV-2 V3 lineage and the previously mentioned HIV-1 V3 loops which are very similar at the protein level despite being distant by cladistic analysis, and which do not possess the distinctive positively charged residues. Highly conserved V3 loop protein sequences are also encountered in SIVAGMs and CIVs (chimpanzee viral strains), which do not appear to be pathogenic in their wild-caught natural hosts.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6893858}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {1}
}

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