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Title: Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report

Abstract

The Shady Grove Solar Office Building is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC. The 3500 square foot structure was designed from the ground up with solar energy as a primary consideration, incorporating both active and passive solar energy collection and storage. The active solar system is designed for heating only. It was determined in the initial design stage that the extra cost of heat exchangers, special piping and pumps would not be justified for DHW considering the small amount of hot water demand in the office. Solar energy is collected by 1500 ft/sup 2/ of KTA tubular solar collectors, stored in a 3000 gallon steel tank, and distributed throughout the building by three water to air heat exchangers in three air handlers. One additional fan coil unit is used for demonstration purposes in the lobby area. The passive system consists of 340 square feet of double glazed windows, oriented true south. This volume includes a narrative description of the building and solar energy system, specifications for the solar energy equipment, acceptance test plans, and photos of the completed project.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Silver Spring (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6881872
Report Number(s):
DOE/CS/32378-T2-Vol.1
ON: DE84001026
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76CS32378
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Microfiche only, copy does not permit paper copy reproduction
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; DIRECT GAIN SYSTEMS; DESIGN; PERFORMANCE; OFFICE BUILDINGS; SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS; SPECIFICATIONS; TESTING; BUILDINGS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; EQUIPMENT; HEATING SYSTEMS; PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT 140901* -- Solar Thermal Utilization-- Space Heating & Cooling

Citation Formats

Not Available. Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Not Available. Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report. United States.
Not Available. 1982. "Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6881872,
title = {Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The Shady Grove Solar Office Building is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC. The 3500 square foot structure was designed from the ground up with solar energy as a primary consideration, incorporating both active and passive solar energy collection and storage. The active solar system is designed for heating only. It was determined in the initial design stage that the extra cost of heat exchangers, special piping and pumps would not be justified for DHW considering the small amount of hot water demand in the office. Solar energy is collected by 1500 ft/sup 2/ of KTA tubular solar collectors, stored in a 3000 gallon steel tank, and distributed throughout the building by three water to air heat exchangers in three air handlers. One additional fan coil unit is used for demonstration purposes in the lobby area. The passive system consists of 340 square feet of double glazed windows, oriented true south. This volume includes a narrative description of the building and solar energy system, specifications for the solar energy equipment, acceptance test plans, and photos of the completed project.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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