skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Inductive field-reversed configuration accelerator for tokamak fueling

Abstract

Compact toroids can be used for fueling other fusion devices by accelerating them to high enough velocities to penetrate strong magnetic fields. In the simplest analysis, the kinetic energy density of a flux-excluding object {1/2}pv{sup 2} must exceed the magnetic field energy density B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0} of the field to be pushed aside. Field reversed configurations (FRCs) are a type of compact toroid that are particularly efficient for this application due to their high density and thus lower required energy per unit mass. FRCs are also formed and accelerated inductively, thus minimizing possible impurity contamination. The Tokamak Refueling by Accelerated Plasmoids (TRAP) experiment was built to develop the inductive acceleration method and test the ability of high-velocity FRCs to penetrate transverse magnetic fields. Simple models have been developed for both the acceleration and penetration processes to determine fueler parameters required for a given tokamak field. Experimental results are given for the acceleration process. Half-milligram FRCs with number densities of 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} were accelerated to velocities of 200 km/s, sufficient to fuel tokamaks with Tesia magnetic fields. The technology is easily extendable to much higher FRC densities and velocities, sufficient to fuel the largest, highest-field tokamaks.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Redmond Plasma Physics Lab.
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
687460
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Fusion Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; TOKAMAK TYPE REACTORS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR FUELING; COMPACT TORUS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; DESIGN; OPERATION; PLASMA ACCELERATION; PLASMOIDS; MAGNETIC FIELD CONFIGURATIONS

Citation Formats

Hoffman, A.L., Gurevich, P., Grossnickle, J., and Slough, J.T. Inductive field-reversed configuration accelerator for tokamak fueling. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Hoffman, A.L., Gurevich, P., Grossnickle, J., & Slough, J.T. Inductive field-reversed configuration accelerator for tokamak fueling. United States.
Hoffman, A.L., Gurevich, P., Grossnickle, J., and Slough, J.T. Wed . "Inductive field-reversed configuration accelerator for tokamak fueling". United States.
@article{osti_687460,
title = {Inductive field-reversed configuration accelerator for tokamak fueling},
author = {Hoffman, A.L. and Gurevich, P. and Grossnickle, J. and Slough, J.T.},
abstractNote = {Compact toroids can be used for fueling other fusion devices by accelerating them to high enough velocities to penetrate strong magnetic fields. In the simplest analysis, the kinetic energy density of a flux-excluding object {1/2}pv{sup 2} must exceed the magnetic field energy density B{sup 2}/2{mu}{sub 0} of the field to be pushed aside. Field reversed configurations (FRCs) are a type of compact toroid that are particularly efficient for this application due to their high density and thus lower required energy per unit mass. FRCs are also formed and accelerated inductively, thus minimizing possible impurity contamination. The Tokamak Refueling by Accelerated Plasmoids (TRAP) experiment was built to develop the inductive acceleration method and test the ability of high-velocity FRCs to penetrate transverse magnetic fields. Simple models have been developed for both the acceleration and penetration processes to determine fueler parameters required for a given tokamak field. Experimental results are given for the acceleration process. Half-milligram FRCs with number densities of 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} were accelerated to velocities of 200 km/s, sufficient to fuel tokamaks with Tesia magnetic fields. The technology is easily extendable to much higher FRC densities and velocities, sufficient to fuel the largest, highest-field tokamaks.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fusion Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}