skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin: Experimental studies and model predictions for surfactant-enhanced remediation applications

Abstract

Partitioning studies of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) to hydropropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and one-dimensional transport simulations were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using HPCD to remove sorbed HOCs in surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) applications. HOC partitioning to HPCD was very fast, with over 95% of the complexation occurring within 10 min. Some influence of solution chemistry and HOC concentration on HOC-HPCD complex formation coefficients was observed; in general, the magnitude of the effects was similar to that observed previously for a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80) but much less than that for an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). HPCD sorption on kaolinite as quantified by both a fluorescence technique and total organic carbon measurements was negligible, indicating no significant affinity of HPCD for the solid phase. Although the HOC solubilization capability of HPCD was lower than that of conventional surfactants such as SDS and Tween 80, transport simulations showed that HPCD can be effective in removing sorbed HOCs from a model subsurface environment, primarily because of its negligible sorption to the solid phase (i.e., all HPCD added facilitates HOC elution). However, in contrast with SDS and Tween 80, HPCD becomes relatively less effective for HOC partitioning with increasing HOC size and hydrophobicity.more » Therefore, comparisons between HPCD and conventional surfactants for enhanced remediation applications must consider the specific HOC(s) present and the potential for surfactant material losses to the solid phase as well as other generally recognized considerations such as material costs and potential toxicological effects.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
687394
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: PBD: 15 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; REMEDIAL ACTION; SURFACTANTS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; DEXTRIN; IN-SITU PROCESSING; SOIL CHEMISTRY; SOILS; GROUND WATER

Citation Formats

Ko, S.O., Schlautman, M.A., and Carraway, E.R. Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin: Experimental studies and model predictions for surfactant-enhanced remediation applications. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es9813360.
Ko, S.O., Schlautman, M.A., & Carraway, E.R. Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin: Experimental studies and model predictions for surfactant-enhanced remediation applications. United States. doi:10.1021/es9813360.
Ko, S.O., Schlautman, M.A., and Carraway, E.R. Sun . "Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin: Experimental studies and model predictions for surfactant-enhanced remediation applications". United States. doi:10.1021/es9813360.
@article{osti_687394,
title = {Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin: Experimental studies and model predictions for surfactant-enhanced remediation applications},
author = {Ko, S.O. and Schlautman, M.A. and Carraway, E.R.},
abstractNote = {Partitioning studies of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) to hydropropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and one-dimensional transport simulations were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using HPCD to remove sorbed HOCs in surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) applications. HOC partitioning to HPCD was very fast, with over 95% of the complexation occurring within 10 min. Some influence of solution chemistry and HOC concentration on HOC-HPCD complex formation coefficients was observed; in general, the magnitude of the effects was similar to that observed previously for a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80) but much less than that for an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). HPCD sorption on kaolinite as quantified by both a fluorescence technique and total organic carbon measurements was negligible, indicating no significant affinity of HPCD for the solid phase. Although the HOC solubilization capability of HPCD was lower than that of conventional surfactants such as SDS and Tween 80, transport simulations showed that HPCD can be effective in removing sorbed HOCs from a model subsurface environment, primarily because of its negligible sorption to the solid phase (i.e., all HPCD added facilitates HOC elution). However, in contrast with SDS and Tween 80, HPCD becomes relatively less effective for HOC partitioning with increasing HOC size and hydrophobicity. Therefore, comparisons between HPCD and conventional surfactants for enhanced remediation applications must consider the specific HOC(s) present and the potential for surfactant material losses to the solid phase as well as other generally recognized considerations such as material costs and potential toxicological effects.},
doi = {10.1021/es9813360},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 16,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}