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Title: Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure

Abstract

The 16-City Study analyzed for gas-phase environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents (nicotine, 3-ethenyl pyridine [3-EP], and myosmine) and for particulate-phase constituents (respirable particulate matter [RSP], ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter [UVPM], fluorescing particulate matter [FPM], scopoletin, and solanesol). In this second of three articles, the authors discuss the merits of each constituent as a marker for ETS and report pair-wise comparisons of the markers. Neither nicotine nor UVPM were good predictors for RSP. However, nicotine and UVPM were good qualitative predictors of each other. Nicotine was correlated with other gas-phase constituents. Comparisons between UVPM and other particulate-phase constituents were performed. Its relation with FPM was excellent, with UVPM approximately 1 1/2 times FPM. The correlation between UVPM and solanesol was good, but the relationship between the two was not linear. The relation between UVPM and scopoletin was not good, largely because of noise in the scopoletin measures around its limit of detection. The authors considered the relation between nicotine and saliva cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine. The two were highly correlated on the group level.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;  [5]
  1. LaKind Associates (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  3. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences
  4. M.E. Ginevan and Associates (United States)
  5. Sapphire Group, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
687379
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Risk Analysis
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; TOBACCO SMOKES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; NICOTINE; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION

Citation Formats

LaKind, J.S., Jenkins, R.A., Naiman, D.Q., Ginevan, M.E., Graves, C.G., and Tardiff, R.G. Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1023/A:1007088209811.
LaKind, J.S., Jenkins, R.A., Naiman, D.Q., Ginevan, M.E., Graves, C.G., & Tardiff, R.G. Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure. United States. doi:10.1023/A:1007088209811.
LaKind, J.S., Jenkins, R.A., Naiman, D.Q., Ginevan, M.E., Graves, C.G., and Tardiff, R.G. Tue . "Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure". United States. doi:10.1023/A:1007088209811.
@article{osti_687379,
title = {Use of environmental tobacco smoke constituents as markers for exposure},
author = {LaKind, J.S. and Jenkins, R.A. and Naiman, D.Q. and Ginevan, M.E. and Graves, C.G. and Tardiff, R.G.},
abstractNote = {The 16-City Study analyzed for gas-phase environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents (nicotine, 3-ethenyl pyridine [3-EP], and myosmine) and for particulate-phase constituents (respirable particulate matter [RSP], ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter [UVPM], fluorescing particulate matter [FPM], scopoletin, and solanesol). In this second of three articles, the authors discuss the merits of each constituent as a marker for ETS and report pair-wise comparisons of the markers. Neither nicotine nor UVPM were good predictors for RSP. However, nicotine and UVPM were good qualitative predictors of each other. Nicotine was correlated with other gas-phase constituents. Comparisons between UVPM and other particulate-phase constituents were performed. Its relation with FPM was excellent, with UVPM approximately 1 1/2 times FPM. The correlation between UVPM and solanesol was good, but the relationship between the two was not linear. The relation between UVPM and scopoletin was not good, largely because of noise in the scopoletin measures around its limit of detection. The authors considered the relation between nicotine and saliva cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine. The two were highly correlated on the group level.},
doi = {10.1023/A:1007088209811},
journal = {Risk Analysis},
number = 3,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {6}
}