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Title: Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions

Abstract

Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAHmore » concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
  3. Aerosol Dynamics Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
687351
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; EMISSION; VEHICLES; CARBON MONOXIDE; CARBON DIOXIDE; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; EXHAUST GASES

Citation Formats

Marr, L.C., Kirchstetter, T.W., Harley, R.A., Hammond, S.K., Miguel, A.H., and Hering, S.V. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es981227l.
Marr, L.C., Kirchstetter, T.W., Harley, R.A., Hammond, S.K., Miguel, A.H., & Hering, S.V. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions. United States. doi:10.1021/es981227l.
Marr, L.C., Kirchstetter, T.W., Harley, R.A., Hammond, S.K., Miguel, A.H., and Hering, S.V. Wed . "Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions". United States. doi:10.1021/es981227l.
@article{osti_687351,
title = {Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions},
author = {Marr, L.C. and Kirchstetter, T.W. and Harley, R.A. and Hammond, S.K. and Miguel, A.H. and Hering, S.V.},
abstractNote = {Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAH concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.},
doi = {10.1021/es981227l},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 18,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}