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Title: Mitigating boom town effects of energy development: a survey

Abstract

The problems of boom towns are important to state and national governments as well as to the affected communities. Case studies of small Western communities describe the socio-economic, governmental, and labor-market problems associated with energy-development growth. No entirely satisfactory way to mitigate these problems has emerged, nor is it likely that a single blueprint can be universally applied. The author recommends a needs assessment program with public participation that focuses community attention on areas of post-boom as well as boom factors; a revision of the legal system to deal with rapid growth; the use of revenues to develop an adequate infrastructure; and intergovernmental cooperation. 143 references.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Public Defender's Office, Clark County, Nevada
OSTI Identifier:
6866766
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6866766
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Energy Law Policy; (United States); Journal Volume: 2:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; BOOM TOWNS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT; INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION; PLANNING; COMMUNITIES; SURVEYS; COOPERATION; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS 530100* -- Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies-- Social & Economic Studies-- (-1989); 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Myler, G.A.. Mitigating boom town effects of energy development: a survey. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Myler, G.A.. Mitigating boom town effects of energy development: a survey. United States.
Myler, G.A.. Fri . "Mitigating boom town effects of energy development: a survey". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6866766,
title = {Mitigating boom town effects of energy development: a survey},
author = {Myler, G.A.},
abstractNote = {The problems of boom towns are important to state and national governments as well as to the affected communities. Case studies of small Western communities describe the socio-economic, governmental, and labor-market problems associated with energy-development growth. No entirely satisfactory way to mitigate these problems has emerged, nor is it likely that a single blueprint can be universally applied. The author recommends a needs assessment program with public participation that focuses community attention on areas of post-boom as well as boom factors; a revision of the legal system to deal with rapid growth; the use of revenues to develop an adequate infrastructure; and intergovernmental cooperation. 143 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Energy Law Policy; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 2:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}
  • In 1986, the Intermountain Power Project neared completion of a fifteen hundred megawatt electric generating plant near the town of Lynndyl, Utah. Seventeen entities of Utah state and local government had entered into some fifty alleviation contracts with the project. These contracts were designed to relieve the impact of plant construction on the sparsely populated community. In the second part of this two part article, the author chronicals and evaluates the success of the impact mitigation process as it was applied to such crucial concerns as housing, public safety, education, water systems, streets and the general quality of life. Themore » author concludes that early professional planning and coordination between government and project officials, combined with the revision of land use and other laws, helped make this major development a success.« less
  • This final article, comparing the use of large and small coal-fired power plants for expanding electrical-generating capacity in the Rocky Mountain West, examines the effects of boom towns and the attitudes of local residents. Neither the pessimistic nor the optimistic view of boom towns was taken by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory computer simulation analysis, which focuses on the impacts of population growth from construction workers. Towns have difficulty accommodating to growth rates above 10 percent, and vary in their willingness and their ability to respond to an influx of new workers. If small plants are distributed at different sites,more » the new workers and the economic benefits will disperse among several communities. The overall conclusion is that, while each proposed plant must be assessed individually to determine the optimum size for the site, small plants offer greater economic and environmental advantages. 12 references, 6 figures.« less
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  • The Boom Town Financing Study report, in two volumes, presents the results of an analysis of public sector financing and housing problems likely to be experienced by Colorado communities impacted by energy development projects. The research was limited to financial and housing needs of energy-impacted areas in the state. Energy-impacted areas experience additional unique problems. They are usually sparsely populated with minimal public services and facilities. The development of energy resources is site-specific. An energy industry must go where the natural resources are located with very few alternative locations. No readily available and timely sources of financial assistance for energy-impactedmore » areas exist in Colorado. Most energy-impacted communities will have an immediate need for sizable quantities of temporary housing for construction workers. (Color illustrations reproduced in black and white.)« less
  • Rapid development in Wheatland, Wyo., a small town near the site of a new Laramie River power plant, has meant many things to many people. Farmers see acres of rich farmland paved over to create housing for the burgeoning population. Construction workers see Wheatland as a typical boom town, in which prices rise continuallyand in which they are resented. Real estate dealers are busy, and city officials are overworked. The town has made a concerted effort to protect its quality of life from the scourges of progress. Residents of Wheatland are interviewed about the changes that have taken place sincemore » the project began, three years ago. Farmers have been hurt most by the project, which will consume huge amounts of water needed for irrigation; much farmland has given way to subdivisions. Planning errors and successes are assessed.« less